Librarian as Outsider by Nora Almeida

Academic librarians are worried about power. And powerlessness. They are particularly concerned with the way power dynamics shape their identities as educators and inform their pedagogical capacity.

Recent library scholarship has introduced a number of compelling arguments for pedagogical alternatives to what Freire calls the “banking concept of education,” which conceives of students as passive “receptacles,” teachers as “depositors,” and knowledge as capital. If James Elmborg’s seminal 2006 article Critical Information Literacy: Implications for Instructional Practice is any indication (it’s been cited more than 250 times as I write this), the banking concept of education doesn’t work for information literacy instruction. Elmborg begins his article with a problem and ends it with a challenge: “the real task for libraries in treating information literacy seriously lies not in defining it or describing it, but in developing a critical practice of librarianship — a theoretically informed praxis.” This is a daunting task, particularly considering the logistical reality of information literacy instruction, which typically happens in ‘one-shot’ library sessions. While a “problem-posing” approach is difficult to achieve in the context of the one-shot, a critical approach is not just an alternative but an imperative.

Here’s why.

Read more: http://www.hybridpedagogy.com/journal/librarian-as-outsider/

Question for Retired or Near-Retirement Professionals: What Advice Would you Give your Earlier Self? ​

….

Actually, this is not a terribly difficult question to answer, as I believe I often speak to my earlier self each time that I speak with a mentee. I advise library students to immerse themselves in the profession from day one Learn to think like an information specialist, walk the talk. Taking courses and attending conferences is only part of the larger equation. To become a librarian or information professional means to adopt the mindset of a professional.

Study best practices, adopt them early. Learn to take initiative based on sound fact-finding, informational interviews, case studies and networking. Adopt educational technology and promote its use. Learn a bit of coding.

As a female librarian, I would say that one should expect as much from oneself as one would from a man. Learn to manage up as well as across and down. Remember that professional development and continuing education is as much your own responsibility as that of your employer, if even more. It is to invest in yourself. Hold yourself accountable for troubleshooting and fact-finding without continually asking others for assistance.

If you are an academic librarian, do not confine yourself to the world of information science. Read and participate in events and professional organizations that interface with the library and staff. Read about trends in higher education, in publishing, in technology. Learn as much as you can about your users, those stakeholders who have an impact on your service and who will benefit from honest dialog about your profession and the services librarians provide.

Becoming a professional is not limited to a 9 to 5 timeslot. In the 21st century, it is an evolving process that is often attended to best beyond the confines of one’s employment. For one who is passionate about the profession, the pursuit for excellence will provide camaraderie, intellectual stimulation and immense personal satisfaction. It will allow you to not only grow spiritually but widen your opportunities for future employment as well as bolster your self-esteem and self-image.

– Stephanie Gross, Electronic Reserves Librarian, Yeshiva University

Read more: http://metro.org/articles/a-question-for-seasoned-professionals/

More On Mentoring: Ask a Special Librarian – May Edition (Pt 2) | INALJ

Ask a Special Librarian – May Edition (Part 2 of 2)

Tracy Z. Maleeff
Library Resources Manager at Duane Morris LLP in Philadelphia
@LibrarySherpa & LibrarySherpa.com

Joshua LaPorte
Law Library Assistant – University of Connecticut
@joshualaporte & https://www.youtube.com/user/JoshuaLaPorte

It’s a banner month for all you INALJ.com readers. You get not one but two editions of “Ask a Special Librarian!” The reason for this special occasion is to introduce you all to my future co-columnist. Beginning next month, Josh LaPorte will be fielding your questions and writing about special librarian concerns. We will be both collaborating on posts as well as taking turns. This change will bring a different perspective for you readers and allow for us to get more creative with this column. It’s a win-win and we thank you for coming along on this journey with us.

TracyJosh2

 

 

 

 

 

So, who is this Josh LaPorte? The son of a librarian, Josh has worked in libraries since he was a teenager.  He currently manages the front desk and collection maintenance at the UConn School of Law Library in Hartford, Connecticut.  Prior to his service at UConn, Josh worked for two library services contracting companies providing services to a wide variety of corporate, not-for-profit, legal, academic, and public libraries around the United States. Josh also worked for several years as a community organizer for a small non-profit organization in Hartford.  He is Vice-Chair of the Connecticut Bar Association Paralegals Section, and is a member of the American Association of Law Libraries, Law Librarians of New England, and the Southern New England Law Librarians Association.

Read more:

http://inalj.com/?p=76760

Avoiding Cinderella Syndrome: Why Every Job Doesn’t Have to be a ‘Perfect’ Fit | INALJ

by Krystal Corbray, Managing Librarian with Yakima Valley Libraries in Washington State
previously published 7/15/14

 

Krystal CorbrayOnce you’ve been job hunting for a while, things can get a bit…intense. Many job-seekers talk about their employment search as if it’s a full-time job—which is an admirable and, often, effective way to go about a job hunt.

It’s only when job-seekers start talking about their efforts while using phrases like “perfect fit” and “dream job” that things can start to head off track.

Why?

Because searching for jobs with an all-or-nothing mindset, like you’re looking for a soul mate, is a surefire way to severely limit your job prospects, and can also mean missing out on some perfectly good opportunities that don’t necessarily fit a checklist of ideal requirements for your dream job.

This isn’t to say that job hunters shouldn’t use a bit of discretion—there’s obviously nothing to gain from blindly applying for jobs simply because “library” or “information” appears somewhere in the description—but there’s definitely a great deal of value to be had by not being overly exclusive in your job hunt. Read more: http://inalj.com/?p=76760

Why Trying to Be “Authentic” at Work May Be Holding You Back

You were probably asked “what do you want to be when you grow up?” a thousand times as a kid. Young people are often advised to make a career decision early on and then pursue that idea, and after years of hearing the same advice, you’ve probably imagined your future professional life—what kind of job you will have, what kind of leader you will be—and now you’re working backwards to get that coveted life you’ve been dreaming of for so long. But that thought process can be a professional trap, limiting your possibilities.

This post originally appeared on Fast Company.

Just when you think you’ve got it figured out, here’s another piece of advice: forget what you think you know about what sort of work you should be doing and who you are professionally. This kind of thinking will trap you, says Herminia Ibarra, an expert in leadership and professor at international business school INSEAD.

“You don’t really know what you need to do to lead if you haven’t done it,” she tells us. “I think people get too caught up and fixated on what’s their ideal self and what they want to work toward when they should just say, ‘Here are a couple of situations where I would like to be more effective, how can I start there and work around the edges of that?”

According to Ibarra, author of the book Act Like a Leader, Think Like a Leader, as you take on more responsibilities at work, you are encouraged to be authentic and true, but this can be tricky if your future self is yet to be formed. Below, she shares the advice she gives managers and executives on allowing your leadership style to evolve and discovering your future authentic self.

Read more: http://lifehacker.com/why-trying-to-be-authentic-at-work-may-be-holding-you-1705334528?utm_campaign=socialflow_lifehacker_facebook&utm_source=lifehacker_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

How to Become an Influencer in Your Company

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf
Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

How to Become an Influencer in Your Company

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 2015-05-12 Email Print this article Print

 4  2 Google +1  1

– See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Professionals become influencers by gaining the confidence of other influencers. So identify and align with decision-drivers who hold high-level positions or are key team members.

Be a Change Agent No one becomes an influencer by simply going along with the status quo. Promote new ideas and approaches. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.gPuIENWo.dpuf

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Signs you’re going to be successful – Business Insider

 

GEtty Images/Andreas Rentz

LinkedIn Influencer Jeff Haden published this post originally on LinkedIn.

It’s not that hard to be successful. But it is hard to be extraordinarily successful.

Yet we all hope to achieve exceptional success (something we all define differently — and should define differently).

Unfortunately, there is no magic bullet. There is no one-size-fits-all prescription.

But there are certain qualities that incredibly successful people share … especially those who also make a significant impact on the lives of other people.

See how many apply to you:

1. You find happiness in the success of others.