Copyright wars are damaging the health of the internet | Technology | guardian.co.uk

Theresa May

Theresa May: determined to spy on everything we do on the internet. Photograph: Anthony Devlin/PA

I’ve sat through more presentations about the way to solve the copyright wars than I’ve had hot dinners, and all of them has fallen short of the mark. That’s because virtually everyone with a solution to the copyright wars is worried about the income of artists, while I’m worried about the health of the internet. Read more….

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The Bestselling E-books of 2012

All the publishers that shared digital information were houses that rack up enough print sales to compete in the bestseller race. And while we estimate that we have more than 1,000 e-books with sales of 25,000+ (see extended list online), we know this does not reflect all e-book sales in the book industry. Still, a look at this quantity underscores that the book business is quickly moving to digital. It would be safe to say that the lackluster performance in mass market has a lot to do with the fact that readers are enjoying the convenience of the electronic devices instead of the more traditional convenience of the paperback. Read more….

via The Bestselling E-books of 2012.

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Leadership and Career Development for the 21st Century Information Professional [Lisa Chow & Sandra Sajonas]

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Abuse at Work: Still not taboo after all these years | WBI

March 15th, 2013

Abuse at Work: Still not taboo after all these years

At WBI we define workplace bullying as health-harming. It not only triggers a host of stress-related diseases that compromise the bullied target’s health, in its severest forms, it is another form of interpersonal abuse. Yes, abuse. Not simply eye-rolling as trivializing critics mischaracterize it. Bullying is a non-physical form of workplace violence. A systematic campaign of interpersonal destruction launched by a single instigator and executed by many joiners. It becomes an attack by many against the lone principled and shocked target.

American society reacts oddly to workplace bullying. Those to whom it has happened (35% of adult Americans) do not doubt its seriousness. Those with no experience are inclined to doubt and castigate the victims as somehow deficient. But we can’t wait for everyone to personally experience it before they agree to stop it.

There is precedent that even in the indisputably violent culture that is the U.S. some forms of abuse have been acknowledged to be morally wrong and prohibited — not eliminated — but frowned upon and condemned. They are taboo — not workplace bullying. Read more….

via Abuse at Work: Still not taboo after all these years | WBI.

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ALA Will Posthumously Award Aaron Swartz With James Madison Award | LJ INFOdocket

Filed by on March 14, 2013

Well done. This is something many of us wanted to see.

From the American Library Association:

On Tuesday, March 15, 2013, Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) will posthumously award activist Aaron Swartz the American Library Association’s (ALA) 2013 James Madison Award during the 15th Annual Freedom of Information Day in Washington, D.C. Swartz will receive the award for his dedication to promoting and protecting public access to research and government information. Read more…

Picture of Aaron Swartz

Picture of Aaron Swartz (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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“Aaron Swartz embodied the ALA’s principles that value open and equal access to information,” said Lofgren. “Aaron’s passing is a significant loss of an outspoken and passionate advocate.”

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Open University research explodes myth of ‘digital native’

Gerald Haigh visits his alma mater to learn that a good attitude to technology correlates with good learning habits

Girl drawing on touchscreen

Is there a digital native? Not according to new Open University research

A new research project by the Open University explores the much-debated concept of “the digital native”. The university does this by making full use of the rich resource which is its own highly diverse student body.

It concludes that while there are clear differences between older people and younger in their use of technology, there’s no evidence of a clear break between two separate populations.

Is there really a distinct group of younger people who are not only easy with technology because they’ve grown up with it, but actually think and learn differently as a result? The idea gained quite a bit of traction after Marc Prensky wrote about the idea ten years ago in Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants,  with other writers weighing in, such as Bradley Jorgensen with Generation X and Generation Y.

Since then, the concept has often been questioned, and even Prensky’s own ideas have changed somewhat. The notion persists in the public imagination though. After all, it seems to bear the fatal hallmark of “common sense”. On one side of the divide is the young person who uses technology like she drives her car, without the need for conscious attention to the process. On the other side sits a grizzled and mature individual, maybe a would-be ‘silver surfer’, frowning impotently at a keyboard and calling for his granddaughter.

This isn’t, though, just a saloon bar debating point, or material for yet another Grumpy Old Men TV programme. If there really is a clear generational separation of brain process, then we need to know more about it because there are important implications for learning. Read more…

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Event – Webinar: Librarianship as an “Avocational Vocation” – Advice for new professionals METRO [FREE]

Speaker Char Booth

Riser, devoted oceanite, and advocate of radical neutrality, Char Booth explores the integration of education, research, technology, and design in libraries. Char is the Instruction Services Manager and E-Learning Librarian at the Claremont Colleges, and is on the faculty of the ACRL Information Literacy Immersion Institute. An ALA Emerging Leader and Library Journal Mover and Shaker, Char blogs at info-mational and tweets at @charbooth. Her publications include Reflective Teaching, Effective Learning: Instructional Literacy for Library Educators (ALA Editions, 2011) and Informing Innovation: Tracking Student Interest in Emerging Library Technologies (ACRL, 2009). Char received a BA in History from Reed College in 2001; an MSIS from the UT Austin School of Information in 2005, and a Master of Computer Education and Technology from Ohio University in 2008.

In this second installment of the METRO / ACRL/NY New Professionals Series, Char Booth, Instruction Services Manager and E-Learning Librarian at the Claremont Colleges, converses with Jason Kucsma, Executive Director of the Metropolitan New York Library Council.

This webinar will focus on building a solid reputation through writing, publishing, and public presentations. Char has published and presented on many topics, including library instruction, the future of access, and using technology to facilitate a positive library experience. Please join us to hear from Char on these subjects and more.

Who should attend:
Librarians new to the field, LIS students, and anyone interested in learning more about the future of librarianship. Read more and register…

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