Launch your Library Career: Preparing Yourself, and Your Materials, for the Challenge by Susanne Markgren, Digital services librarian

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So You Think You Want to Be a Librarian?

Most people’s knowledge of librarianship is a mash-up of Katherine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy in Desk Set, some warm and fuzzy memories from an elementary school class visit, Rupert Giles from Buffy the Vampire Slayer, even fuzzier memories of all-nighters in their college libraries, and maybe a high-minded article or two about the Digital Public Library of America.

If this sounds familiar, don’t be embarrassed. Librarianship is a notoriously opaque profession, and most Americans have about as much understanding of what we do as they have of cloistered nuns, or actuaries.

Here’s the first shocker: most professional-level library positions require a masters in library or information science, most commonly known as “the M.L.S.” Since the M.L.S. involves a serious commitment of time and money, then you better be doubly sure that this is the right decision, at least for the next decade or two. Read more…

 

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Library Learning Goes Online – YouTube

American Libraries Live—online learning is changing the way schools work. From elementary to graduate school to continuing education, online tools are creating new horizons in distance learning and new tools to supplement in-person learning. But what does this mean for libraries?

Sarah Steiner, Social Work and Virtual Services Librarian at Georgia State University Library will lead our expert panel:

  • John Shank, Instructional Design Librarian and Associate Director of the Center for Learning and Teaching at Penn State University
  • Lauren Pressley, Head of Instruction at Wake Forest University Libraries

Don’t Leave College Without These 10 Digital Skills

Graduation season is upon us, and that means college graduates everywhere are preparing to enter “the real world.” But chances are your liberal arts degree, as hard-earned and valuable as it is, doesn’t equip you with every digital skill you need.

We’ve put together a short list of fundamental skills that every college graduate should possess, from simply branding yourself online to learning basic coding. They’re guaranteed to increase your overall digital know-how, and you can learn them all on your own.

Did you graduate college a long time ago, or never attended? Don’t worry — it’s never too late to learn these skills. They’re useful to anyone.

1. Setting Up a Wi-Fi Network

These days, most students are lucky enough to go to colleges that already have wireless Internet set up in the dorms. By simply typing in a password on the provided network, the web magically appears on your laptop. But once you graduate, that’s no longer the case. To save yourself from this harsh reality, learn what it takes to get working Wi-Fi: setting up the modem, launching a new network and researching local companies and pricing.

Read more…

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SLJ’s 2013 Job Satisfaction Survey | What’s Not to Love? By Laura Girmscheid on May 6, 2013

.Chart Designs by Mark Tuchman.

Igniting a love for reading is primarily what drives job satisfaction for librarians who work with teens. And satisfied they are—seven out of ten school media specialists and public librarians working directly with children and/or teens report they are either satisfied or very satisfied with their jobs. SLJ set out to learn more about the motivations and challenges in the profession in a recent national job satisfaction survey of just over 1,000 school and public librarians. Read more….

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6 Surprisingly Effective Networking Icebreakers | CareerBliss

6 Surprisingly Effective Networking Icebreakers
Posted April 23, 2013

Networking IcebreakersThe high school prom. Do you remember yours? For every daydream you had of dancing the night away to your favorite Billy Idol song, wrapped in the arms of your crush, there was also the pre-prom nightmare of arriving late, of wearing the wrong clothes, of spending the night alone on the bench while the guy or gal of your dreams leaves hand-in-hand with somebody else.

Unless you’re a die-hard social butterfly, networking events may inspire similar mixed feelings of both fear and anticipation in you.  In your mind’s eye, you see yourself effortlessly breezing from group to group, waves of laughter following you as you regale your peers with tales of your company’s climb to fame. In reality, you find yourself leaving after several awkward hours, tail between your legs, the pack of business cards you had specially printed for the event unopened in your pocket.

What can you do to make sure that the time and money you put into attending professional networking events pays off?

No matter what your reasons for attending, you won’t achieve a thing if you don’t talk to people, and to do that, you must first break the ice. You may have the most amazing business plan in the world, but nobody will know it if you don’t take that first step and make contact with them.

We asked industry experts for their best networking icebreakers. Read more…

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23 Mobile Things everyone should know

This looks like an excellent opportunity to bone up on Library 2.0. If you have experience with this program, please send feedback. Thank you.

Holiday time or not, the time is right for you all to go and investigate 23 Mobile Things – a wonderful professionally delivered opportunity to learn a few important life-skills for working and living in online environments!

The background

I’m sure most of you have heard about 23 Things for Professional Development – an open-source program for librarians. There are many variants of this course which was first developed in 2006 by Helene Blowers and the team at the Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenberg County, and now the newish kid on the block is 23 Mobile Things, a course revolving around digital and mobile technologies.

Who created this course?

“The first version of 23 mobile things was developed in Danish by Jan Holmquist. This version of the course is an international collaboration, Jan Holmquist from Guldborgsund-bibliotekerne (Denmark) and Mylee Joseph and Kathryn Barwick from the State Library of…

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