How I Solve Problems By Risa Fogel | Posted 08-21-2014

The process for solving a problem in the workplace often involves diffusing the situation, correctly defining the problem, and controlling any variables that might impact the outcome.

leadership

By Risa Fogel

One of the most stressful times in a person’s career is when they have to tell someone above them in the corporate hierarchy, “We have a problem.” As someone who has both delivered and received this message, I know the problem can be anything from a fairly insignificant miscommunication to a major outage in a mission-critical system. At times, the problem takes on a life of its own, causing much angst and speculation about who is going to take the blame or who is going to deliver the bad news. People get very caught up in the emotion of the situation, revisiting the problem without actually identifying a solution.

While the size of the problem dictates the amount of time and attention needed to solve it, the process for solving it remains fairly consistent. Diffusing the situation, defining the problem and controlling variables that are impacting the outcome will generally lead to a positive outcome. Outlined below are more details on these tried-and-true steps to problem solving.

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7 Ways Women Can Build Confidence at Work – US News

Smiling businesswoman at work.

Part of feeling confident is acting confident. Walk with purpose, make eye contact and stand tall.

By Aug. 7, 2014 | 8:10 a.m. EDT+ More

When it comes to appearing confident on the job, many women follow what men are doing. A few sports analogies, a neutral business suit … what could exude confidence better than acting like a man? Try this instead: Be yourself.

Women still are underrepresented in many industries, in government positions and in the board room. But that can change. Exuding confidence is one step toward getting off that sticky floor and moving up the corporate ladder. And you don’t have to act like a man to get there.

1. Be aware of your word choice. Women tend to undermine themselves by using softer wording, such as “I think” or “maybe,” or even apologizing for interjecting. You don’t have to interrupt or be rude, but use more confident words that make a statement – not a gentle suggestion. Read more…

Google can’t compete with a skilled librarian steeped in information technology

I think of my job as very much going to the root of librarianship, which is facilitating learning … and creating community. The main difference is that I (and my library) are moving well beyond just books, as are many other libraries.” — Mikael Jacobsen

 

“I think of my job as very much going to the root of librarianship, which is facilitating learning … and creating community. The main difference is that I (and my library) are moving well beyond just books, as are many other libraries.” — Mikael Jacobsen

In the six months Mikael Jacobsen has worked as learning experiences manager at the Skokie Public Library, his days have come to include everything from teaching classes to producing movies and offering information about Microsoft Office products. He oversees the library’s digital media lab, coordinates its digital literacy offerings and introduces ideas in hands-on learning for non-traditional items, such as video cameras patrons can check out.

On top of that, Jacobsen oversees the library’s computer areas and study rooms and helps patrons find materials and research any given topic.

“I think of my job as very much going to the root of librarianship, which is facilitating learning,” said Jacobsen, 38, who earned a Masters of Library and Information Science from Dominican University in 2008. “We are facilitating learning and creating community. The main difference is that I (and my library) are moving well beyond just books, as are many other libraries.” Read more…