How to Decide to Accept a Job Offer – 05-06-2015 : METRO in New York, NY US METRO

 

by Ellen Mehling, Career Development Consultant, METRO

 
We recently discussed how to decide to leave your current job. At some point in your career, you’ll find yourself facing the opposite decision, too, perhaps because you decided to leave a former position: whether or not to accept a job offer. Some of the same factors should be taken into consideration as when you’re deciding to resign, but there are additional components to consider, too.

 

20150505_How_to_Decide_to_Accept_a_Job_Offer.jpgFirst, be really honest with yourself throughout your decision-making, and make sure your choice comes from your own needs and preferences and not anyone else’s.

 

You can consult others and seek their advice (in fact, that is recommended), but remember that your advisors won’t be suffering the consequences if you make the wrong decision. While it is best to avoid making big decisions in a hurry, in most cases you will only have a couple of days or maybe a week from the initial offer, through negotiations, and to a “yes” or “no” from you to the employer.

 

Even if the offer sounds at first like it is just what you want, always ask for a few days to think it over, and then use that time to examine every aspect of the offer. Don’t say “yes” just because of a salary that makes you smile or because you have been unemployed or underemployed and at last you’ve been offered the full-time position you have wanted for a while.

 

Some things to consider:

 

  • Is the job description clear? Is it what you want to do, what you enjoy doing, and what you are good at? When you think of where you want to be in five years, or ten years, is this job keeping you on the road to that goal?

Read more…

 

Advertisements

3 Reasons Why You Can’t Get a Promotion

It happens to the best of us. You did not get the promotion you wanted and think you deserved. This hurts, it is frustrating, but it is not a career ender. You can choose to mope and get angry, or you can learn from this experience by taking a look at yourself and the situation to figure out the reason you were skipped over.

Here are three common reasons even the most talented, qualified professionals can’t get a promotion. Read more….

3 Reasons Why You Can't Get a Promotion

How to become a master networker – Business Insider

If your concept of networking is going to a cocktail party and exchanging a stack of business cards with strangers you’re not actually interested in, then you’re doing it wrong.

Building meaningful connections with smart, talented people across industries and job functions can lead to valuable client relationships, future job offers, and greater influence.

In the graphic below, we’ve gathered some tips from master networkers like Wharton professor Adam Grant, Influencers founder Jon Levy, and Women’s Success Coaching founder Bonnie Marcus.

Whether you’re an introvert or extrovert, these proven tactics will help you connect with anyone.

How to become a master networker - Business Insider

 

More On Mentoring: Ask a Special Librarian – May Edition (Pt 2) | INALJ

Ask a Special Librarian – May Edition (Part 2 of 2)

Tracy Z. Maleeff
Library Resources Manager at Duane Morris LLP in Philadelphia
@LibrarySherpa & LibrarySherpa.com

Joshua LaPorte
Law Library Assistant – University of Connecticut
@joshualaporte & https://www.youtube.com/user/JoshuaLaPorte

It’s a banner month for all you INALJ.com readers. You get not one but two editions of “Ask a Special Librarian!” The reason for this special occasion is to introduce you all to my future co-columnist. Beginning next month, Josh LaPorte will be fielding your questions and writing about special librarian concerns. We will be both collaborating on posts as well as taking turns. This change will bring a different perspective for you readers and allow for us to get more creative with this column. It’s a win-win and we thank you for coming along on this journey with us.

TracyJosh2

 

 

 

 

 

So, who is this Josh LaPorte? The son of a librarian, Josh has worked in libraries since he was a teenager.  He currently manages the front desk and collection maintenance at the UConn School of Law Library in Hartford, Connecticut.  Prior to his service at UConn, Josh worked for two library services contracting companies providing services to a wide variety of corporate, not-for-profit, legal, academic, and public libraries around the United States. Josh also worked for several years as a community organizer for a small non-profit organization in Hartford.  He is Vice-Chair of the Connecticut Bar Association Paralegals Section, and is a member of the American Association of Law Libraries, Law Librarians of New England, and the Southern New England Law Librarians Association.

Read more:

http://inalj.com/?p=76760

Avoiding Cinderella Syndrome: Why Every Job Doesn’t Have to be a ‘Perfect’ Fit | INALJ

by Krystal Corbray, Managing Librarian with Yakima Valley Libraries in Washington State
previously published 7/15/14

 

Krystal CorbrayOnce you’ve been job hunting for a while, things can get a bit…intense. Many job-seekers talk about their employment search as if it’s a full-time job—which is an admirable and, often, effective way to go about a job hunt.

It’s only when job-seekers start talking about their efforts while using phrases like “perfect fit” and “dream job” that things can start to head off track.

Why?

Because searching for jobs with an all-or-nothing mindset, like you’re looking for a soul mate, is a surefire way to severely limit your job prospects, and can also mean missing out on some perfectly good opportunities that don’t necessarily fit a checklist of ideal requirements for your dream job.

This isn’t to say that job hunters shouldn’t use a bit of discretion—there’s obviously nothing to gain from blindly applying for jobs simply because “library” or “information” appears somewhere in the description—but there’s definitely a great deal of value to be had by not being overly exclusive in your job hunt. Read more: http://inalj.com/?p=76760

Why Trying to Be “Authentic” at Work May Be Holding You Back

You were probably asked “what do you want to be when you grow up?” a thousand times as a kid. Young people are often advised to make a career decision early on and then pursue that idea, and after years of hearing the same advice, you’ve probably imagined your future professional life—what kind of job you will have, what kind of leader you will be—and now you’re working backwards to get that coveted life you’ve been dreaming of for so long. But that thought process can be a professional trap, limiting your possibilities.

This post originally appeared on Fast Company.

Just when you think you’ve got it figured out, here’s another piece of advice: forget what you think you know about what sort of work you should be doing and who you are professionally. This kind of thinking will trap you, says Herminia Ibarra, an expert in leadership and professor at international business school INSEAD.

“You don’t really know what you need to do to lead if you haven’t done it,” she tells us. “I think people get too caught up and fixated on what’s their ideal self and what they want to work toward when they should just say, ‘Here are a couple of situations where I would like to be more effective, how can I start there and work around the edges of that?”

According to Ibarra, author of the book Act Like a Leader, Think Like a Leader, as you take on more responsibilities at work, you are encouraged to be authentic and true, but this can be tricky if your future self is yet to be formed. Below, she shares the advice she gives managers and executives on allowing your leadership style to evolve and discovering your future authentic self.

Read more: http://lifehacker.com/why-trying-to-be-authentic-at-work-may-be-holding-you-1705334528?utm_campaign=socialflow_lifehacker_facebook&utm_source=lifehacker_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

How to Become an Influencer in Your Company

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf
Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

How to Become an Influencer in Your Company

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 2015-05-12 Email Print this article Print

 4  2 Google +1  1

– See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Professionals become influencers by gaining the confidence of other influencers. So identify and align with decision-drivers who hold high-level positions or are key team members.

Be a Change Agent No one becomes an influencer by simply going along with the status quo. Promote new ideas and approaches. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.gPuIENWo.dpuf

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf