7 Mindsets That Will Radically Improve Your Life Right Now

Your mindset is as important as your best idea. Develop a good one, and you make everything in your life better immediately.

Read more: http://www.inc.com/lolly-daskal/7-mindsets-that-will-radically-improve-your-life-right-now.html?cid=sf01002

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5 Office Mistakes Costing Millennials the Promotion How managers are misinterpreting Millennials’ approach to success in the workplace.

By J.T. O’Donnell
Founder and CEO, CareerHMO.com
IMAGE: Getty Images

Now that career-minded Millennials make up 50 percent of our workplace, it’s safe to assume (like every other generation to enter the work force) they’ll want to earn promotions as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, we’re hearing across the board that a lot of Millennial workers aren’t promotion material, citing a lack of drive and professionalism. However, the real problem lies in a lack of Millennial understanding of the power of perception. In my experience, simple insights are all Millennials need to turn things around.

“People hear what they see.” –Doris Day

We know actions speak louder than words. What some Millennials don’t understand is certain actions at work give the perception they’re lazy and unskilled.

Let’s take a look at the most common mistakes Millennials make and how they get misperceived.

1. Being a clock-puncher. Millennials value their free time. As a result, some tend to be meticulous about only working the hours they’re paid for–to the second, i.e., they walk in at 8:29 a.m. and leave at 5:59 p.m. on the dot (because they took exactly 30 minutes for lunch). When you’re so focused on leaving the office not a minute later than you need to stay, you send the message you couldn’t care less about the work you’re doing. In the mind of management, it’s just a job to you. Perhaps that’s the case, but managers have no desire to promote people who aren’t focused on and interested in the work they do.

Advice to Millennials: Once or twice a week, stay 15 minutes past your normal work hour and get an extra task done. As the rest of your peers exit en masse, you can score a chance to say good night and make small talk with your boss about what you’re working on and why you chose to stay late to finish it. Those moments can help you build a better personal connection with your boss and show you aren’t obsessed with the clock–two things the boss will consider when a promotion comes available.

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Librarian as Outsider by Nora Almeida

Academic librarians are worried about power. And powerlessness. They are particularly concerned with the way power dynamics shape their identities as educators and inform their pedagogical capacity.

Recent library scholarship has introduced a number of compelling arguments for pedagogical alternatives to what Freire calls the “banking concept of education,” which conceives of students as passive “receptacles,” teachers as “depositors,” and knowledge as capital. If James Elmborg’s seminal 2006 article Critical Information Literacy: Implications for Instructional Practice is any indication (it’s been cited more than 250 times as I write this), the banking concept of education doesn’t work for information literacy instruction. Elmborg begins his article with a problem and ends it with a challenge: “the real task for libraries in treating information literacy seriously lies not in defining it or describing it, but in developing a critical practice of librarianship — a theoretically informed praxis.” This is a daunting task, particularly considering the logistical reality of information literacy instruction, which typically happens in ‘one-shot’ library sessions. While a “problem-posing” approach is difficult to achieve in the context of the one-shot, a critical approach is not just an alternative but an imperative.

Here’s why.

Read more: http://www.hybridpedagogy.com/journal/librarian-as-outsider/

4 Habits That Kill Career Potential

The harder a habit is to acquire, the greater the reward that stems from acquiring that behavior. Rarely is the acquisition of desirable traits or the culmination of a successful career happenstance.

Regardless of popular consensus, most individuals are not born with immense abilities. Rather, the actions a person takes and how often they engage in those habits will either propel or completely diminish abilities.

Read more: http://theundercoverrecruiter.com/habits-kill-career-potential/?utm_source=Undercover+Recruiter+Newsletter&utm_campaign=85e99ad14d-July+9th+2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ecc4b8afd3-85e99ad14d-58822677

Act Like A Business Owner To Advance Your Career by Andy Robinson

Whether you work for a global corporation, a small business, or for yourself, it is absolutely essential you THINK and ACT like an “owner” if you want to advance your career. You need to “own” your job, own your role as a leader or manager, own your roles and responsibilities – put yourself in the shoes of a business owner, and think and behave as any owner would do.

Related: 7 Sacrifices You Need To Make To Advance Your Career

This is not new career advice; many of us have heard this before, and many of us have probably given this advice to others. But what does it actually MEAN to think and act like a business owner?

Standing in the shoes of a business owner is a mind-set shift and in my opinion includes fully embracing the following as part of HOW you DO your job and how you THINK about your job:

1. Show Passion And Enthusiasm

Both your head and your heart need to be “in the game.” Your clients and customers need to see and “feel” your enthusiasm for what you do. Your colleagues, team mates and direct reports need to sense your passion for what you do. Passion and enthusiasm are the fuel for the energy that flows into your job. Others are drawn to you and inspired by you in direct correlation to level of sincere passion and enthusiasm you exhibit.

Read more: http://www.careerealism.com/business-owner-advance-career/

3 Ways Your Resume Makes You Look Old by Annette Richmond

There’s no doubt that we live in a culture obsessed with youth. That doesn’t mean you’re over the hill at 40. Many people are active and working in their 50’s, 60’s and beyond–if you’re Betty White well beyond–but most of us don’t want to brag about it. The fact is that age discrimination is alive and well.

Related: Resumes For Job Seekers Over 50

One of the keys to staying attractive to potential employers is to not look or act out-of-date – in person or on paper. This doesn’t that you shouldn’t post a photo on your LinkedIn profile. Profiles without pictures only make recruiters, and potential employers, wonder what you may be hiding. And the truth is they are going to meet you during the interview process. So there’s no reason to hide.

Still, there are many ways you can date yourself without realizing it. Here are three ways your resume can make you look old.

1. Objective Statement

Over the years, styles change. You wouldn’t wear the same suit as you did 20 years ago. Unless you’re a collector, the car you’re driving looks a lot different too. The same is true for resumes.

Read more:

http://www.careerealism.com/resume-make-look-old/

15 Ways Successful People Approach Life Differently by Jeff Haden

In many ways successful people are the same as everyone else.

Yet look closely and you’ll see that in certain key ways, they are very, very different.

Here are the qualities that set exceptional people apart:

1. They hate playing politics.

Successful people can’t stand playing politics — and to some degree, people who play politics. They don’t care about jockeying for promotions or trying to be “right” in a meeting.

A successful person’s primary focus is on solving difficult problems and accomplishing cool things.

Read more: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/15-ways-successful-people-approach-life-differently-jeff-haden?trk=hp-feed-article-title-like

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