6 reasons 20-somethings don’t get promoted

Caroline Beaton Aug. 29, 2016

8424415835_7117453f30_oFlickr/Francisco Osorio

According to a recent millennial leadership survey from The Hartford, 80% of millennials see themselves as leaders today.

Yet only 12% of Gen Y held management roles in 2013; and less than a third of The Hartford’s sample reported that they’re currently business leaders.

Maybe we’re entitled and delusional. Or maybe, explained millennial expert and author of “Becoming the Boss,” Lindsey Pollak, we have a progressive understanding of what it means to be a leader. “Millennials believe they can lead from whatever position they’re in,” she said. We know we don’t need an official title to impact our organization.

But if millennials really are leading from behind, why aren’t we getting promoted?

If you’re ambitious but stuck on Level 1, below are six possible reasons. (Warning, tough love ahead.) Read more…

12 Ways to Know You Genuinely Have Emotional Intelligence

Genuine people have a profound impact upon everyone they encounter. Discover the unique habits that cause them to radiate with energy and confidence.

by Travis Bradberry

There’s an enormous amount of research suggesting that emotional intelligence (EQ) is critical to your performance at work. TalentSmart has tested the EQ of more than a million people and found that it explains 58 percent of success in all types of jobs.

People with high EQs make $29,000 more annually than people with low EQs. Ninety percent of top performers have high EQs, and a single-point increase in your EQ adds $1,300 to your salary. I could go on and on.

Suffice it to say, emotional intelligence is a way to focus your energy with tremendous results.

TalentSmart Homepage

Read more…

Résumés: What You Must—and Must Not—Include

Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 2016-08-04
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Job seekers in the digital age face good news/bad news prospects when it comes to résumés. The good news? It’s easier than ever to send a résumé, as nine out of 10 are now posted online or sent via email, up from 22 percent in 2000. The bad news? Hirers now spend an average of only five to seven seconds looking at these documents. The upshot: You need to make a good impression quickly, while avoiding résumé traps that immediately turn off potential employers. To provide insight into best practices, Glassdoor has come up with a list of résumé must haves, which we’ve adapted here, that cover everything from awards to IT certifications to your Facebook page. Essentially, Glassdoor’s tips encourage job candidates to go beyond a listing of schools attended and positions held to drive toward clear, vivid summaries about your ability to make an impact. In addition to the must haves, Glassdoor also compiled a list of words you should never use in a résumé—including clichés and other well-worn buzz phrases—and we’ve included some of those here. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/resume-tips-what-you-mustand-must-notinclude.html?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=EWK_NL_ECSM_20160809_STR2L1&dni=347701603&rni=22602104#sthash.f95R2nWI.dpuf