10 Mistakes Job Seekers Make On Their LinkedIn Profiles

Forbes Coaches Council. | Dec 7, 2016

If it seems like everyone is on LinkedIn these days, it’s because they probably are. With the median number of years at one job at 4.years and 94% of recruiters using LinkedIn as a tool to vet candidates, it’s no wonder LinkedIn has become an active professional hub.

But don’t just slap your profile together and hope for the best. Below, members of Forbes Coaches Council discuss 10 common mistakes to be aware of so that you can rise above the competition.

whats-one-common-mistake-job-seekers-make-in-their-linkedin-profiles_

From left to right: Casey Carpenter, Adrienne Tom, Shannon Bradford, Julie Bondy Roberts, Cherly Lynch Simpson, Erin Kennedy, Mo Chanmugham, John O’Connor, Shauna C. Bryce, Leslie Mizerack. All photos courtesy of the individual members.

1. Writing Using ‘Resume-Speak Vs. Authentic Language’ 

A common mistake is to use canned “resume-speak” words that may be made up or overused. Why say, “Our cross-functional team implemented, proceduralized, and metricized our program under my leadership?” How about, “I lead the team that initiated the project, and we saw it through to completion. We came in ,000 under budget, three weeks prior to the deadline.”   – Casey CarpenterThe Sales Breakthrough Coach 

2. Content Misses The Mark 

Failing to demonstrate value to the target audience can cause confusion and lack of interest. To garner attention from prospective employers, job seekers must be selective and strategic in profile details, peppering in keywords and quantifiable evidence that is well-aligned with reader requirements. Robust details are great, but tailored content will boost visibility and reader retention.   – Adrienne TomCareer Impressions 

Read more…

10 Ways The Job Application Process Is Changing

 

 

10 Ways The Job Application Process Is Changing

1. Applicants Are Using E-Notes 

The job search application is becoming less formal and this trend has extended to cover letters. While I still recommend having a well-written one handy, sending a briefer and less formal version in the body of an email — an e-note — as opposed to attaching a separate document, is increasing in popularity and acceptance. One should still include interest, achievements and relevant skills.   – Emily Kapit, MS, MRW, ACRW, CPRWReFresh Your Step, LLC 

2. Job Ads Are Not Where You Put Your Energy 

It’s not all that new but the reality is that the online employment system is broken. Employers post job ads and then become overwhelmed with candidates who aren’t quite right. The real power lies in getting connected through LinkedIn LNKD +0.16%, colleagues, professional associations and network meetings. Figure out where you want to work and then create a job or tap an unadvertised position.   – Laura DeCarloCareer Directors international 

Read more…_

5 Hidden Costs Of Not Interning Before You Graduate

Guest post written by

Kaytie Zimmerman

I write about money and career for millennials at optimisticmillennial.com.

kaytie

Summer break for college students has finally arrived. They have plans to spend time at the beach, lake, or music festivals. Relaxation is important, but they may not realize that there are hidden costs if they don’t use this time to complete an internship before they graduate.

The costs are in the form of career potential, earnings, and time. All of these are important, but which are most significant to a new graduate?

Inability to Compete with Other Graduates

As students don their black robes and graduation caps this spring, they’ll enter a competitive pool of job seekers. Do you know how you stack up against your peers?

In 2014, 75% of graduates left school with at least one internship completed. Further, employers are now looking for work experience above other factors in selecting entry-level candidates.

It comes back to the all-too-painful chicken and egg reality most millennials have faced. They are told they need experience to get a job, but they need a job to get experience.

According to the Chronicle of Higher Education and the American Public Media’s Marketplace survey, internship experience is the single most important credential for recent graduates to have on their resume in their job search.

Adding an internship to your resume before you hit the real world will at least keep you on pace with your peers, if not give you an edge.

Lose Out on ‘Foot in the Door’ Opportunities

Most job seekers are familiar with online job submissions being referred to as the “black hole” where their resume disappears, never to be found again.

One of the ways to get a foot in the door to your first job is to find an internship at a company that regularly hires their interns as full-time employees.  Read more…

The LinkedIn Profile Checklist Every Job Seeker Needs Don Goodman November 12, 2015

Job searching has taken a new direction. It’s not about going to the job boards, finding the job opening you like, and then applying to it. That method will only have you waiting by the phone for a call that’s likely not going to happen. Today’s job seekers need to take a more proactive and interactive approach called job networking – and LinkedIn is a resource to help you do it.

Related: 6 Things Recruiters Want To See On Your LinkedIn Profile

When you’ve created an effective LinkedIn profile, it’ll help you get in front of the right contacts (recruiters, hiring managers, professionals in the field, etc.) who can lead you to the path of the next job opportunity. However, in order for it all to happen you do need a LinkedIn profile that communicates and displays the right information. Take a run through the LinkedIn Profile checklist below:

Present a Headline that talks to your target audience. Read more….

How to Decide to Accept a Job Offer – 05-06-2015 : METRO in New York, NY US METRO

 

by Ellen Mehling, Career Development Consultant, METRO

 
We recently discussed how to decide to leave your current job. At some point in your career, you’ll find yourself facing the opposite decision, too, perhaps because you decided to leave a former position: whether or not to accept a job offer. Some of the same factors should be taken into consideration as when you’re deciding to resign, but there are additional components to consider, too.

 

20150505_How_to_Decide_to_Accept_a_Job_Offer.jpgFirst, be really honest with yourself throughout your decision-making, and make sure your choice comes from your own needs and preferences and not anyone else’s.

 

You can consult others and seek their advice (in fact, that is recommended), but remember that your advisors won’t be suffering the consequences if you make the wrong decision. While it is best to avoid making big decisions in a hurry, in most cases you will only have a couple of days or maybe a week from the initial offer, through negotiations, and to a “yes” or “no” from you to the employer.

 

Even if the offer sounds at first like it is just what you want, always ask for a few days to think it over, and then use that time to examine every aspect of the offer. Don’t say “yes” just because of a salary that makes you smile or because you have been unemployed or underemployed and at last you’ve been offered the full-time position you have wanted for a while.

 

Some things to consider:

 

  • Is the job description clear? Is it what you want to do, what you enjoy doing, and what you are good at? When you think of where you want to be in five years, or ten years, is this job keeping you on the road to that goal?

Read more…

 

How to become a master networker – Business Insider

If your concept of networking is going to a cocktail party and exchanging a stack of business cards with strangers you’re not actually interested in, then you’re doing it wrong.

Building meaningful connections with smart, talented people across industries and job functions can lead to valuable client relationships, future job offers, and greater influence.

In the graphic below, we’ve gathered some tips from master networkers like Wharton professor Adam Grant, Influencers founder Jon Levy, and Women’s Success Coaching founder Bonnie Marcus.

Whether you’re an introvert or extrovert, these proven tactics will help you connect with anyone.

How to become a master networker - Business Insider

 

Networking Rules for Job-seekers: the Good, the Bad and the Almost Perfect | LinkedIn

Networking Rules for Job-seekers: the Good, the Bad and the Almost Perfect

Lou Adler

Lou Adler

CEO, best-selling author, created Performance-based Hiring. Recent book: The Essential Guide for Hiring & Getting Hired

Networking is about meeting people you know who can vouch for your past performance and connect you with people you don’t know.

After writing The Best Job-hunting Secrets of All Time, and reading the comments, I can safely conclude that 20% of job-seekers find networking necessary, appropriate, and comfortable. Another 20% find it necessary, but uncomfortable. The rest are either not doing it, or doing it wrong. (Note: I’ll be hosting a job-seeker webcast on Oct 10th discussing this and related topics.)

As many of you know I wrote a book, The Essential Guide for Hiring & Getting Hired, attempting to describe the hiring process from all perspectives: job-seekers (active and passive), recruiters (the good and bad), and hiring managers (the fully- and not-so-fully engaged). One theme of the book was to suggest that job-seekers need to take matters into their own hands when they find companies, recruiters or hiring managers using some flawed hiring process. The techniques in the book will not help you get a job you don’t deserve; they will only help you get one you do.

 

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