What You Need To Know About Digital Applications As Part Of Your Job Search

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez October 11, 2016

Tablet Computer. Business Woman Using Digital Tablet Computer Pc

If you are like many of my clients, you have already found yourself frustrated when filling out digital applications online. Simply trying to make your way through the maze of a company’s applicant tracking system just to upload your resume can seem like an endless Odyssey that Homer himself might tell of. As with my clients, I advise you not to focus too much effort on applying online as this is just a snapshot in the overall album of your job search. With knowledge comes power. The following information will empower you when it comes to ATS so you can put your best foot forward when applying online.

Related: 3 Ways To Get Your Resume Past The ATS

What Is ATS?

The Applicant Tracking System is software that allows businesses and recruiting companies to centralize their efforts in recruiting and managing employees. For employers, there are several benefits to this type of technology including its ability to collect and sort data. In addition, companies can offer existing employees internal opportunities before searching externally for qualified candidates. Government regulations are becoming ever more stringent about protecting personal data, and ATS software can often meet or exceed the security threshold for businesses and organizations.

Read more…

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6 Steps To Maximize Your School’s Career Center As The Path To Job Success by Nicolette Weinbaum

by Nicolette Weinbaum

April 13, 2016

As many seniors in universities across the country will tell you, there’s no shortage of bright and accomplished graduates from top schools, all competing for a shrinking number of opportunities.

In fact, the competition for an entry-level position has never been fiercer. Newsweek recently noted that 2.8 million graduates will enter the workforce in 2016.  The scary part is that 40 percent of the total number of unemployed in the U.S. will be made up of 18-to-29-year olds, an unemployment rate of almost 14 percent among that age bracket (almost three times the national figure). Read more…shutterstock_284570267

 

A top recruiter on what anyone can see after 30 seconds with your resume

Hello. (Inspirestock/Corbis)

This question originally appeared on Quora: What do recruiters look for in a resume at first glance? Answer by Ambra Benjamin, Engineering Recruiter.

 I don’t look through stacks of resumes anymore. I hate paper. I do everything online.
 There has been for many decades, a mysterious Wizard of Oz-type viewpoint of the recruiting world that I think is somewhat misappropriated. People seem to be truly fascinated by what goes on behind the curtain, when in reality, recruiters aren’t running the covert operation many think. “Does this candidate seem like they stand a chance of being a good match for this role? If yes, proceed to next step. If no, reject.”
 I’ll highlight how I personally absorb a resume. I should preface this by saying that currently I primarily recruit for senior-level software engineers. In my past life I recruited for PMs, MBAs, finance, sales, and pretty much all of it. Everything I’m about to say broadly applies to all of these fields. I also was a campus recruiter, and you read resumes of new grads a bit differently since experience is less meaty. So for non-new grads, here’s how it goes in my brain:
  • Most recent role. I’m generally trying to figure out what this person’s current status is, and why/if they might even be interested in a new role. Have they only been in their last position for three months? If so, probably not the best time for me to reach out, right? Unless they work for Zynga, or somewhere tragic like that (said with great respect for Farmville, the app that put Facebook apps on the map). If it’s an incoming resume, I’m wondering why the candidate is looking now. Are they laid off? Did they get fired? Have they only been in their role for a few months and they’re possibly hating it? But most importantly, is their most recent experience relevant to the position for which I’m hiring?
  • Company recognition. Not even gonna lie. I am a company snob. Now don’t get all Judgy McJudgerson about my judgy-ness. Hear me out. It’s not even that I think certain companies are better than others (although some most certainly are). It’s purely a matter of how quickly can I assign a frame of reference. This is also known as “credibility.” Oh you worked at Amazon? Then you’re probably accustomed to working on projects at scale. You’re at a well known crash-and-burn start-up? You have probably worn many hats and have been running at a sprinter’s pace. There are some pretty blatant if/then associations I can make simply by recognizing a company name. Because recruiters have generally been doing this job for awhile, we notice patterns and trends among candidates from certain companies and we formulate assumptions as a result. There are edge cases and our assumptions can fail us, but again, this is a resume review; we’re talking a less than 20-second analysis. Assigning frame of reference is often more difficult to do when a candidate has only worked for obscure companies I’ve never heard of. When I can’t assign company recognition, it just means I have to read the resume a little deeper, which usually isn’t an issue, unless it’s poorly formatted, poorly written, uninformative, and wrought with spelling errors—in which case, you might have lost my interest.

Read more….http://qz.com/525496/done-what-a-recruiter-sees-on-your-resume-at-first-glance/

What Went Right: A Case Study of a Successful Hiring (Part 1) by Ellen Mehling, Career Development Consultant, METRO

Ellen MehlingEllen Mehling: Where did you go to school? What degrees and/or certificates do you hold?

Krissa Corbett Cavouras: I attended Sarah Lawrence for my undergraduate degree and earned my masters from Pratt School of Information and Library Science (SILS) in 2011.
EM: Were you employed elsewhere when you applied for this job? For how long had you been job hunting?

KCC: I was working for a small e-commerce company, as a knowledge manager on their marketing team, for two years prior to starting at Brooklyn Public Library. I had probably been actively looking for about three months when I had my first interview here.
EM: How did you learn about the position? Did you have any connections via your network to that workplace?

KCC: I heard about the position on a couple of fronts — first, because I’ve had Brooklyn Public Library’s job page bookmarked for years, ever since I graduated from library school! Second, my manager Robin and I have several mutual friends from our early days as bloggers, so I saw the job shared around that mutual circle on Facebook. (I do think that’s how I knew it was in serious recruitment, because sometimes you don’t know from a website job posting if it’s a really open position.) I also have several library school colleagues who now work in the system, although I don’t think I saw this specific posting on my library school listserv. http://metro.org/articles/what-went-right-a-case-study-of-a-successful-hiring-part-1/

6 Changes You Should Make to Your Job Search by Hannah Morgan

It’s harder than ever to land a good job. So if you’re unemployed and searching for one, you’re probably frustrated. While employers cite many reasons why finding the right talent is nearly impossible, you can only control what you are doing (and not doing) to get on an their radar.

Here are a few things you should do differently to get more interviews.

1. Cut the time you spend on job boards. If you’re like most job seekers, you rely heavily on job boards and LinkedIn job postings as your primary sources to uncover job opportunities. This reactive approach is unlikely to result in an interview, because most employers rely on referrals to fill jobs with external candidates. And in reality, the majority of jobs are filled with internal candidates, and even if these positions were advertised, you wouldn’t stand a chance.

Job postings are great for mining information on the specific skills required for jobs. Postings can also help you identify potential employers (and competitors) who are known to hire for the types of jobs you are interested in. Once you’ve identified these companies, you can begin to find people you know or should know who work inside the company. This is how referrals happen.

Read more: http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2015/07/01/6-changes-you-should-make-to-your-job-search?src=usn_fb Networking is Networking is crucial during a job search, but you must take the time to build meaningful relationships.

Avoiding Cinderella Syndrome: Why Every Job Doesn’t Have to be a ‘Perfect’ Fit | INALJ

by Krystal Corbray, Managing Librarian with Yakima Valley Libraries in Washington State
previously published 7/15/14

 

Krystal CorbrayOnce you’ve been job hunting for a while, things can get a bit…intense. Many job-seekers talk about their employment search as if it’s a full-time job—which is an admirable and, often, effective way to go about a job hunt.

It’s only when job-seekers start talking about their efforts while using phrases like “perfect fit” and “dream job” that things can start to head off track.

Why?

Because searching for jobs with an all-or-nothing mindset, like you’re looking for a soul mate, is a surefire way to severely limit your job prospects, and can also mean missing out on some perfectly good opportunities that don’t necessarily fit a checklist of ideal requirements for your dream job.

This isn’t to say that job hunters shouldn’t use a bit of discretion—there’s obviously nothing to gain from blindly applying for jobs simply because “library” or “information” appears somewhere in the description—but there’s definitely a great deal of value to be had by not being overly exclusive in your job hunt. Read more: http://inalj.com/?p=76760