Mark Cuban: Don’t Go to College to Study Business. Study the Humanities | February 18, 2017

Career Advice | Higher Education

by John Feacuban

Johnson: So essentially what you’re making the case for is education and job training for grown ups.

Cuban: No, no. I think that won’t matter. What are you going to go back and learn to do?

Johnson: What it takes, right? Whether it’s finance, whether it’s software programming.

Cuban: No finance. That’s the easiest thing — you just take the data have it spit out whatever you need. I personally think there’s going to be a greater demand in 10 years for liberal arts majors than there were for programming majors and maybe even engineering, because when the data is all being spit out for you, options are being spit out for you, you need a different perspective in order to have a different view of the data. And so having someone who is more of a freer thinker.

Cuban’s forecast of the skills needed to succeed in the future echoes that of computer science and higher education experts who believe people with “soft skills,” like adaptability and communication, will have the advantage in an automated workforce.

Cuban highlighted English, philosophy, and foreign language majors as just some of the majors that will do well in the future job market.

Watch the entire interview here.

How to market yourself with a winning résumé

by Dennis McCafferty | 12-08-2016

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Are you one of the many executives who haven’t looked at their résumé in months … or years? Do you think it’s not necessary because you’re secure and happy with your current company and feel that revising your résumé would be a waste of time? Well, you may want to reassess your thinking, because career experts recommend that you review your résumé at least once a year. After all, résumés are often submitted as part of consideration for award nominations, guest bylines, speaking events at industry conference and partnership opportunities. It would also help to have a strong résumé in case your organization gets involved in a merger or acquisition. To this end, we’ve come up with the following best practices for résumés, which is adapted from an article by Lisa Rangel, titled “9 Executive Résumé Trends for 2017.” Founder of ResumeCheatSheet.com, Rangel is an executive résumé writer and official LinkedIn moderator at Chameleonresumes.com. Career Toolkit recently named her as one of the top 28 résumé writers. – See more at: http://www.cioinsight.com/it-management/careers/slideshows/how-to-market-yourself-with-a-winning-resume.html#sthash.pcWgX3Gw.dpuf

10 Ways The Job Application Process Is Changing

 

 

10 Ways The Job Application Process Is Changing

1. Applicants Are Using E-Notes 

The job search application is becoming less formal and this trend has extended to cover letters. While I still recommend having a well-written one handy, sending a briefer and less formal version in the body of an email — an e-note — as opposed to attaching a separate document, is increasing in popularity and acceptance. One should still include interest, achievements and relevant skills.   – Emily Kapit, MS, MRW, ACRW, CPRWReFresh Your Step, LLC 

2. Job Ads Are Not Where You Put Your Energy 

It’s not all that new but the reality is that the online employment system is broken. Employers post job ads and then become overwhelmed with candidates who aren’t quite right. The real power lies in getting connected through LinkedIn LNKD +0.16%, colleagues, professional associations and network meetings. Figure out where you want to work and then create a job or tap an unadvertised position.   – Laura DeCarloCareer Directors international 

Read more…_

6 reasons 20-somethings don’t get promoted

Caroline Beaton Aug. 29, 2016

8424415835_7117453f30_oFlickr/Francisco Osorio

According to a recent millennial leadership survey from The Hartford, 80% of millennials see themselves as leaders today.

Yet only 12% of Gen Y held management roles in 2013; and less than a third of The Hartford’s sample reported that they’re currently business leaders.

Maybe we’re entitled and delusional. Or maybe, explained millennial expert and author of “Becoming the Boss,” Lindsey Pollak, we have a progressive understanding of what it means to be a leader. “Millennials believe they can lead from whatever position they’re in,” she said. We know we don’t need an official title to impact our organization.

But if millennials really are leading from behind, why aren’t we getting promoted?

If you’re ambitious but stuck on Level 1, below are six possible reasons. (Warning, tough love ahead.) Read more…

Résumés: What You Must—and Must Not—Include

Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 2016-08-04
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Job seekers in the digital age face good news/bad news prospects when it comes to résumés. The good news? It’s easier than ever to send a résumé, as nine out of 10 are now posted online or sent via email, up from 22 percent in 2000. The bad news? Hirers now spend an average of only five to seven seconds looking at these documents. The upshot: You need to make a good impression quickly, while avoiding résumé traps that immediately turn off potential employers. To provide insight into best practices, Glassdoor has come up with a list of résumé must haves, which we’ve adapted here, that cover everything from awards to IT certifications to your Facebook page. Essentially, Glassdoor’s tips encourage job candidates to go beyond a listing of schools attended and positions held to drive toward clear, vivid summaries about your ability to make an impact. In addition to the must haves, Glassdoor also compiled a list of words you should never use in a résumé—including clichés and other well-worn buzz phrases—and we’ve included some of those here. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/resume-tips-what-you-mustand-must-notinclude.html?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=EWK_NL_ECSM_20160809_STR2L1&dni=347701603&rni=22602104#sthash.f95R2nWI.dpuf

How To Make ‘I Just Got Fired’ Sound Better When You Interview

July 26, 2016

Jérôme Cukier, Quora contributor

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(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

How do I explain being fired to a potential employer? originally appeared on Quora: the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights.

Answer by Jérôme Cukier, software engineer, on Quora:

Your answer should:

    1. Be true.
    2. Help you advance in the interview process (or at least not stop you).

It’s very important to keep both of these things in mind. You should answer in a truthful way because it’s the right thing to do, but also because if your potential employer catches you lying before you even work for them it’s very unlikely you’d get the job. Yet, the goal of your answer is not to put you down, it’s the opposite. You want to leave a positive impression.

Another thing to keep in mind, even if less important than the two above, is to be concise. You really don’t want to spend your interview time talking about this. There is still a lot of latitude and what you should say depends on the circumstances and the employer. Perhaps nobody will ask you why you left your previous employer (just kidding, everyone will ask!). Read more…

8 Signs an Employee Is Exceptional (Which Never Appear on Performance Evaluations)

Many are good. Some are superior. And a few–just a few–are exceptional. Here’s how to tell the difference.
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