How to Disagree with Someone More Powerful than You | HBR

Negotiation skills | Workplace |Success  | Career advice

by Amy Gallo | March 17, 2016

Originally appeared in Harvard Business Review

cat and lobster

Your boss proposes a new initiative you think won’t work. Your senior colleague outlines a project timeline you think is unrealistic. What do you say when you disagree with someone who has more power than you do? How do you decide whether it’s worth speaking up? And if you do, what exactly should you say?

What the Experts Say
It’s a natural human reaction to shy away from disagreeing with a superior. “Our bodies specialize in survival, so we have a natural bias to avoid situations that might harm us,” says Joseph Grenny, the coauthor of Crucial Conversations and the cofounder of VitalSmarts, a corporate training company. “The heart of the anxiety is that there will be negative implications,” adds Holly Weeks, the author of Failure to Communicate. We immediately think, “He’s not going to like me,” “She’s going to think I’m a pain,” or maybe even “I’ll get fired.” Although “it’s just plain easier to agree,” Weeks says that’s not always the right thing to do. Here’s how to disagree with someone more powerful than you.

Be realistic about the risks
Most people tend to overplay the risks involved in speaking up. “Our natural bias is to start by imagining all the things that will go horribly wrong,” Grenny says. Yes, your counterpart might be surprised and a little upset at first. But chances are you’re not going to get fired or make a lifelong enemy. He suggests you first consider “the risks of not speaking up” — perhaps the project will be derailed or you’ll lose the team’s trust — then realistically weigh those against the potential consequences of taking action.

Read more…

 

Advertisements

How nice people can master conflict | LinkedIn

Workplace | Communication | Career advice

by Travis Bradberry | LinkedIn Influencer | 03-20-16

When you’re a nice person, conflict can be a real challenge. Not that mean people are any better at conflict; they just enjoy it more.

New research from Columbia University shows that how you handle conflict can make or break your career. The researchers measured something scientifically that many of us have seen firsthand—people who are too aggressive in conflict situations harm their performance by upsetting and alienating their peers, while people who are too passive at handling conflict hinder their ability to reach their goals.

The secret to effective handling of conflict is assertiveness—that delicate place where you get your needs met without bullying the other person into submission. Assertive people strike a careful balance between passivity and aggression (that is, they never lean too far in either direction).

Read more…

 

14 Things That Impact The Quality Of Your Personal Brand

Quality and personal excellence are two key elements of your personal brand. The degree to which you fully embrace the importance of these elements is communicated to others on a continuous basis and is incorporated into others’ vision of who you are (i.e. the personal brand that you broadcast).

RELATED: The Perfect Recipe For A Great Personal Brand

Those who are fully aware of this fact can definitely undertake action to broadcast a personal brand that elevates their professionalism through conscious focus on quality and personal excellence.

Here are 14 things that impact the quality of your personal brand:

  • Every e-mail message you send to someone else.
  • Every voicemail message you leave for someone.
  • The voicemail message others hear when they try to reach you.
  • Your e-mail “signature.”
  • Read more…

Why We Struggle to Communicate (and How to Fix It)

 

aaeaaqaaaaaaaarxaaaajgi3mtllyzqyltbhy2etnde1ni1immexltq2mjm5nmuyzwexnq

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” George Bernard Shaw

Dr. Travis Bradberry

Coauthor Emotional Intelligence 2.0 & President at TalentSmart

When it comes to communication, we all tend to think we’re pretty good at it. Truth is, even those of us who are good communicators aren’t nearly as good as we think we are. This overestimation of our ability to communicate is magnified when interacting with people we know well.

Researchers at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business put this theory to the test and what they discovered is startling. In the study, the researchers paired subjects with people they knew well and then again with people they’d never met. The researchers discovered that people who knew each other well understood each other no better than people who’d just met! Even worse, participants frequently overestimated their ability to communicate, and this was more pronounced with people they knew well.

“Our problem in communicating with friends is that we have an illusion of insight,” said study co-author Nicholas Epley. “Getting close to someone appears to create the illusion of understanding more than actual understanding.”

Read more…

How to Communicate Effectively at Work [INFOGRAPHIC]

communicate-effectively

Communication is the basis of every company – needless to say, if communication isn’t optimum, you will fail in more ways than one. If you are in the driver seat of your company, make sure your work on your communication skills to avoid misunderstandings that can damage not only your brand, but the working atmosphere as well.

Corporate psychology firm Davitt has put together this infographic, rounding up the best tips to be effective in the way you communicate.

Communication is the basis of every company – needless to say, if communication isn’t optimum, you will fail in more ways than one. If you are in the driver seat of your company, make sure your work on your communication skills to avoid misunderstandings that can damage not only your brand, but the working atmosphere as well.

Corporate psychology firm Davitt has put together this infographic, rounding up the best tips to be effective in the way you communicate. Read more…

Why Leaders Can’t Afford to Overlook Rudeness at Work

Heather R. Huhman Contributor Career and Workplace Expert; Founder and President, Come Recommended

August 31, 2015

Anger, gossip and irresponsibility are the sorts of behaviors that come to mind when we think about a toxic workplace, but a new study reveals another behavior leaders should beware of: rudeness.

Rude behavior is contagious and can spread quickly throughout the workplace, according to the study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology in June. The study found impolite interactions cause employees to perceive rudeness in later interactions, which often results in impolite retaliation.

Leaders shouldn’t tolerate this kind of harmful behavior — it’s not something that can be swept under the rug. Here are some ways to address rudeness in the workplace, before it spreads:

1. Set and maintain expectations.

One of the most important employee needs is clear expectations. If there aren’t any established boundaries and expectations, employees don’t have a guideline to follow.

“Great managers don’t just tell employees what’s expected of them and leave it at that; instead, they frequently talk with employees about their responsibilities and progress. They don’t save those critical conversations for once-a-year performance reviews,” states an article published in Gallup’s Business Journal in April.

Establish expectations through frequent conversations with employees. Don’t not just meet monthly or quarterly. Keep a positive tone and address examples of what employees already do well. When gray areas are uncovered, address them by collaborating with employees to determine a set rule.

Related: How the Epidemic of Bad Behavior Affects Your Business

Read more: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/250005

Image credit: Marie Richie | Flickr