Good News for Young Strivers: Networking Is Overrated | op-ed

Career advice | Networking | Employment

Advertisements

How To Make The Most Of Your Day When Job Searching

BACK

How To Make The Most Of Your Day When Job Searching

Posted November 16, 2015

It’s often a shock to the system when you first lose your job. Your routine is gone, there are no deadlines, and you are often alone in your home while the people you live with go to school or work.

So, what happens now? A whole day in front on you – no deadlines, no commute, no projects to complete – what is the best way to go about your day?

According to a recent poll by Climber.com, the job seeker’s day is divided like this:

  • Searching For Positions Online – 29.94%
  • Applying To Positions – 27.28%
  • Networking – 24.11%
  • Researching Companies – 12.89%
  • Working With A Recruiter – 5.56%
  • Read more…

6 Changes You Should Make to Your Job Search by Hannah Morgan

It’s harder than ever to land a good job. So if you’re unemployed and searching for one, you’re probably frustrated. While employers cite many reasons why finding the right talent is nearly impossible, you can only control what you are doing (and not doing) to get on an their radar.

Here are a few things you should do differently to get more interviews.

1. Cut the time you spend on job boards. If you’re like most job seekers, you rely heavily on job boards and LinkedIn job postings as your primary sources to uncover job opportunities. This reactive approach is unlikely to result in an interview, because most employers rely on referrals to fill jobs with external candidates. And in reality, the majority of jobs are filled with internal candidates, and even if these positions were advertised, you wouldn’t stand a chance.

Job postings are great for mining information on the specific skills required for jobs. Postings can also help you identify potential employers (and competitors) who are known to hire for the types of jobs you are interested in. Once you’ve identified these companies, you can begin to find people you know or should know who work inside the company. This is how referrals happen.

Read more: http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2015/07/01/6-changes-you-should-make-to-your-job-search?src=usn_fb Networking is Networking is crucial during a job search, but you must take the time to build meaningful relationships.

How to become a master networker – Business Insider

If your concept of networking is going to a cocktail party and exchanging a stack of business cards with strangers you’re not actually interested in, then you’re doing it wrong.

Building meaningful connections with smart, talented people across industries and job functions can lead to valuable client relationships, future job offers, and greater influence.

In the graphic below, we’ve gathered some tips from master networkers like Wharton professor Adam Grant, Influencers founder Jon Levy, and Women’s Success Coaching founder Bonnie Marcus.

Whether you’re an introvert or extrovert, these proven tactics will help you connect with anyone.

How to become a master networker - Business Insider

 

3 Reasons You Should Think Like A ‘Business-Of-One’ | CAREEREALISM

3 Reasons You Should Think Like A ‘Business-Of-One’ | CAREEREALISM.

3 Reasons Why You Should Think Like A ‘Business-Of-One’

YOUR INTRODUCTION, ELEVATOR SPEECH, AND ORIGIN STORY: FACE TO FACE NETWORKING TIPS

YOUR INTRODUCTION, ELEVATOR SPEECH, AND ORIGIN STORY: FACE TO FACE NETWORKING TIPS

by Ellen Mehling, Career Development Consultant, METRO

It is well-known that networking is vital to a successful job search and a thriving career. LinkedIn has made it easy to connect with a large number of people, but in-person interactions should not be neglected and should be conducted with thought and care. Those who have met you in person and who really know you and have worked with you in some way are going to be the most beneficial to you. These are the people who will refer, recommend, or even hire you. These first words and conversations with other professionals can make or break your opportunity for further contact.

Your Introduction

You will be remembered by the manner in which you introduce yourself, so choose those first words deliberately. Sometimes just your name, title, and workplace will suffice. And sometimes just your name and a general descriptive title (even just “librarian”) is appropriate, depending on the person or audience you are introducing yourself to.

In some cases, a few words describing what you do will be needed. If, for example, your title doesn’t make your job responsibilities clear or if there is a certain skill you want to be sure the person you are talking to knows about you, be sure to mention that too. If you are a student, give the name of the school and your degree-in-progress, with the possible addition of the kind of information work you hope to do following graduation.

It is best not to introduce yourself by saying you are unemployed or job hunting. I have heard many info pros begin their introduction with something like, “I was laid off two years ago…” We all have setbacks in our careers. By introducing yourself with a past setback you are telling other people that this one-time event, which may have occurred some time ago, has defined you in a permanent way. This encourages others to think of you as unemployed and that is not likely to lead to new opportunities. I would also avoid the phrase “in transition” as it has come to mean “long-term unemployed”.

Lead with your strengths; introduce yourself in the present tense, (“I am…” rather than “I was…”) and have some project or part-time job or volunteering or internship or blog or research or service in a professional organization that you can talk about later in the conversation. Keep your introduction to one or two sentences. After that, *listen* to the other person’s self-introduction and ask a follow-up question or two, to get things started. Read more…

 

Enhanced by Zemanta