How to market yourself with a winning résumé

by Dennis McCafferty | 12-08-2016

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Are you one of the many executives who haven’t looked at their résumé in months … or years? Do you think it’s not necessary because you’re secure and happy with your current company and feel that revising your résumé would be a waste of time? Well, you may want to reassess your thinking, because career experts recommend that you review your résumé at least once a year. After all, résumés are often submitted as part of consideration for award nominations, guest bylines, speaking events at industry conference and partnership opportunities. It would also help to have a strong résumé in case your organization gets involved in a merger or acquisition. To this end, we’ve come up with the following best practices for résumés, which is adapted from an article by Lisa Rangel, titled “9 Executive Résumé Trends for 2017.” Founder of ResumeCheatSheet.com, Rangel is an executive résumé writer and official LinkedIn moderator at Chameleonresumes.com. Career Toolkit recently named her as one of the top 28 résumé writers. – See more at: http://www.cioinsight.com/it-management/careers/slideshows/how-to-market-yourself-with-a-winning-resume.html#sthash.pcWgX3Gw.dpuf

What You Need To Know About Digital Applications As Part Of Your Job Search

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez October 11, 2016

Tablet Computer. Business Woman Using Digital Tablet Computer Pc

If you are like many of my clients, you have already found yourself frustrated when filling out digital applications online. Simply trying to make your way through the maze of a company’s applicant tracking system just to upload your resume can seem like an endless Odyssey that Homer himself might tell of. As with my clients, I advise you not to focus too much effort on applying online as this is just a snapshot in the overall album of your job search. With knowledge comes power. The following information will empower you when it comes to ATS so you can put your best foot forward when applying online.

Related: 3 Ways To Get Your Resume Past The ATS

What Is ATS?

The Applicant Tracking System is software that allows businesses and recruiting companies to centralize their efforts in recruiting and managing employees. For employers, there are several benefits to this type of technology including its ability to collect and sort data. In addition, companies can offer existing employees internal opportunities before searching externally for qualified candidates. Government regulations are becoming ever more stringent about protecting personal data, and ATS software can often meet or exceed the security threshold for businesses and organizations.

Read more…

Résumés: What You Must—and Must Not—Include

Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 2016-08-04
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Job seekers in the digital age face good news/bad news prospects when it comes to résumés. The good news? It’s easier than ever to send a résumé, as nine out of 10 are now posted online or sent via email, up from 22 percent in 2000. The bad news? Hirers now spend an average of only five to seven seconds looking at these documents. The upshot: You need to make a good impression quickly, while avoiding résumé traps that immediately turn off potential employers. To provide insight into best practices, Glassdoor has come up with a list of résumé must haves, which we’ve adapted here, that cover everything from awards to IT certifications to your Facebook page. Essentially, Glassdoor’s tips encourage job candidates to go beyond a listing of schools attended and positions held to drive toward clear, vivid summaries about your ability to make an impact. In addition to the must haves, Glassdoor also compiled a list of words you should never use in a résumé—including clichés and other well-worn buzz phrases—and we’ve included some of those here. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/resume-tips-what-you-mustand-must-notinclude.html?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=EWK_NL_ECSM_20160809_STR2L1&dni=347701603&rni=22602104#sthash.f95R2nWI.dpuf

3 Ways Your Resume Makes You Look Old by Annette Richmond

There’s no doubt that we live in a culture obsessed with youth. That doesn’t mean you’re over the hill at 40. Many people are active and working in their 50’s, 60’s and beyond–if you’re Betty White well beyond–but most of us don’t want to brag about it. The fact is that age discrimination is alive and well.

Related: Resumes For Job Seekers Over 50

One of the keys to staying attractive to potential employers is to not look or act out-of-date – in person or on paper. This doesn’t that you shouldn’t post a photo on your LinkedIn profile. Profiles without pictures only make recruiters, and potential employers, wonder what you may be hiding. And the truth is they are going to meet you during the interview process. So there’s no reason to hide.

Still, there are many ways you can date yourself without realizing it. Here are three ways your resume can make you look old.

1. Objective Statement

Over the years, styles change. You wouldn’t wear the same suit as you did 20 years ago. Unless you’re a collector, the car you’re driving looks a lot different too. The same is true for resumes.

Read more:

http://www.careerealism.com/resume-make-look-old/

7 Ways Your LinkedIn Profile And Resume Should Differ

At the core of your LinkedIn experience is your profile. As you complete it, you are prompted to include information for all of your educational background as well as companies and positions that you’ve held over the course of your career.

Sounds pretty much like a résumé, right?

Not so much.

LinkedIn is evolving and if you are a savvy job hunter, you will seize the opportunity to utilize its new features to your advantage

 

 

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Convert Your Word Doc into a Plain-Text Resume

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Word .docs look terrible as plain-text files if you just change the extension. Follow these steps to ensure your formatting meets best practices no matter what version you’re using.

Convert Your Word Doc into a Plain-Text Resume

If you’ve spent time carefully selecting the right font for your resume, aligning the margins and crafting a clean outline of justified section titles and subtitles, the last thing you want to do is render the whole thing in plain text. But that’s just what you need to do, said several resume-writing experts, includingBarbara Safani, owner of the career-management firm Career Solvers and Job-Hunt.org.

Read more…

By Lisa Vaas

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