How to market yourself with a winning résumé

by Dennis McCafferty | 12-08-2016

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Are you one of the many executives who haven’t looked at their résumé in months … or years? Do you think it’s not necessary because you’re secure and happy with your current company and feel that revising your résumé would be a waste of time? Well, you may want to reassess your thinking, because career experts recommend that you review your résumé at least once a year. After all, résumés are often submitted as part of consideration for award nominations, guest bylines, speaking events at industry conference and partnership opportunities. It would also help to have a strong résumé in case your organization gets involved in a merger or acquisition. To this end, we’ve come up with the following best practices for résumés, which is adapted from an article by Lisa Rangel, titled “9 Executive Résumé Trends for 2017.” Founder of ResumeCheatSheet.com, Rangel is an executive résumé writer and official LinkedIn moderator at Chameleonresumes.com. Career Toolkit recently named her as one of the top 28 résumé writers. – See more at: http://www.cioinsight.com/it-management/careers/slideshows/how-to-market-yourself-with-a-winning-resume.html#sthash.pcWgX3Gw.dpuf
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Résumés: What You Must—and Must Not—Include

Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 2016-08-04
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Job seekers in the digital age face good news/bad news prospects when it comes to résumés. The good news? It’s easier than ever to send a résumé, as nine out of 10 are now posted online or sent via email, up from 22 percent in 2000. The bad news? Hirers now spend an average of only five to seven seconds looking at these documents. The upshot: You need to make a good impression quickly, while avoiding résumé traps that immediately turn off potential employers. To provide insight into best practices, Glassdoor has come up with a list of résumé must haves, which we’ve adapted here, that cover everything from awards to IT certifications to your Facebook page. Essentially, Glassdoor’s tips encourage job candidates to go beyond a listing of schools attended and positions held to drive toward clear, vivid summaries about your ability to make an impact. In addition to the must haves, Glassdoor also compiled a list of words you should never use in a résumé—including clichés and other well-worn buzz phrases—and we’ve included some of those here. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/resume-tips-what-you-mustand-must-notinclude.html?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=EWK_NL_ECSM_20160809_STR2L1&dni=347701603&rni=22602104#sthash.f95R2nWI.dpuf

A top recruiter on what anyone can see after 30 seconds with your resume

Hello. (Inspirestock/Corbis)

This question originally appeared on Quora: What do recruiters look for in a resume at first glance? Answer by Ambra Benjamin, Engineering Recruiter.

 I don’t look through stacks of resumes anymore. I hate paper. I do everything online.
 There has been for many decades, a mysterious Wizard of Oz-type viewpoint of the recruiting world that I think is somewhat misappropriated. People seem to be truly fascinated by what goes on behind the curtain, when in reality, recruiters aren’t running the covert operation many think. “Does this candidate seem like they stand a chance of being a good match for this role? If yes, proceed to next step. If no, reject.”
 I’ll highlight how I personally absorb a resume. I should preface this by saying that currently I primarily recruit for senior-level software engineers. In my past life I recruited for PMs, MBAs, finance, sales, and pretty much all of it. Everything I’m about to say broadly applies to all of these fields. I also was a campus recruiter, and you read resumes of new grads a bit differently since experience is less meaty. So for non-new grads, here’s how it goes in my brain:
  • Most recent role. I’m generally trying to figure out what this person’s current status is, and why/if they might even be interested in a new role. Have they only been in their last position for three months? If so, probably not the best time for me to reach out, right? Unless they work for Zynga, or somewhere tragic like that (said with great respect for Farmville, the app that put Facebook apps on the map). If it’s an incoming resume, I’m wondering why the candidate is looking now. Are they laid off? Did they get fired? Have they only been in their role for a few months and they’re possibly hating it? But most importantly, is their most recent experience relevant to the position for which I’m hiring?
  • Company recognition. Not even gonna lie. I am a company snob. Now don’t get all Judgy McJudgerson about my judgy-ness. Hear me out. It’s not even that I think certain companies are better than others (although some most certainly are). It’s purely a matter of how quickly can I assign a frame of reference. This is also known as “credibility.” Oh you worked at Amazon? Then you’re probably accustomed to working on projects at scale. You’re at a well known crash-and-burn start-up? You have probably worn many hats and have been running at a sprinter’s pace. There are some pretty blatant if/then associations I can make simply by recognizing a company name. Because recruiters have generally been doing this job for awhile, we notice patterns and trends among candidates from certain companies and we formulate assumptions as a result. There are edge cases and our assumptions can fail us, but again, this is a resume review; we’re talking a less than 20-second analysis. Assigning frame of reference is often more difficult to do when a candidate has only worked for obscure companies I’ve never heard of. When I can’t assign company recognition, it just means I have to read the resume a little deeper, which usually isn’t an issue, unless it’s poorly formatted, poorly written, uninformative, and wrought with spelling errors—in which case, you might have lost my interest.

Read more….http://qz.com/525496/done-what-a-recruiter-sees-on-your-resume-at-first-glance/