Ten Things That Are Worse For Your Career Than Getting Fired

Career advice | Employment | Job termination

by Liz Ryan | March 7, 2017

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Dear Liz,

I am in a sticky situation at work. I was transferred into this position against my will a year ago.

My supervisor “Vince” is the least popular supervisor in the company. Nobody transfers into his department voluntarily…..

Dear Cam,

If Vince terminates you, you will find out that getting fired is not a big deal, especially when you know it’s a personality conflict and nothing more……

Getting fired is not damaging to your career unless you believe it is.

Here are 10 things that are worse for your career than getting fired: [italics mine]

1. Staying in a job you hate only because you’re afraid of making a change.

2. Letting your co-workers down so many times that they stop trusting you, and building a bad reputation for yourself in the process.

Read article:

 

You’ve Got the Job, Now What? How to Stay Relevant at the Workplace

Career Advice | Mentoring | Employment |Professional development

By on February 22, 2017

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Do more, achieve more, stay relevant

You’ve made it through the first 18 months of your social-impact job! Give yourself a pat on the back. I know it wasn’t easy but you didn’t break, and now you’ve made a name for yourself.

As I mentioned in part one of this series, You’ve Got the Job…What’s Next?once you’ve been at your job for 12-18 months, you should be working toward “Superstar Status” by stepping outside of your role and establishing yourself as a leader. You’ll need to be more and do more in order to stay relevant.

Here’s how to stay relevant at the workplace by excelling at your work and stepping up for new challenges, opportunities, and responsibilities:

Be an advocate and an ambassador

Read more…

Master Confrontation

Leadership & Management Career Coach, Introvert Whisperer

If you’re a leader or intend to be, you will have to do things to step out of your comfort zone. It’s part of the job.

Confronting peers, subordinates and even the boss (at times) when results aren’t matching plan expectations must take place to steer things back to where they need to be. If you avoid it, you are knowingly allowing the business to drive over the metaphorical cliff. It’s a poor business practice.

Granted confrontation feels so uncomfortable that the majority of people avoid it altogether. Of course, we know stories of the ugly side of confrontation when a leader has allowed the situation to fester to an ugly, emotional rampage. Even though this type of tirade may make the point for course correction, it’s damaging and dysfunctional. No one wins.

What’s the solution? Read more…

Ten Things I Couldn’t Care Less About When I’m Hiring

Hiring people is such an organic and human activity, it kills me to see how many companies do it badly. They try to make recruiting a linear, data-driven and analytical process, but that’s impossible, because recruiting is all about the energy that flows between and among people.

It has nothing to do with data. It has nothing to do with particles — like all human activities, it is all about waves!

Recruiting has nothing to do with keyword-searching algorithms. How sad it is to see how my HR profession has devolved!   Read more…

 

8 Signs an Employee Is Exceptional (Which Never Appear on Performance Evaluations)

Many are good. Some are superior. And a few–just a few–are exceptional. Here’s how to tell the difference.

From Both Sides Now Mentoring the next generation of librarians

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For most librarians, their first year working in a library is the biggest learning experience of their career. I remember coming into my first library job so clueless about, well, everything and feeling a year later like a completely different person: a professional. But that time in between was filled with cringeworthy mistakes and a whole lot of anxiety.

At the same time, I felt like I had unlimited stores of passion, energy, and ideas that year. My colleagues took me seriously even though I was green, and some of those rookie ideas became services the library still offers, like chat reference. I frequently hear about new-to-the-profession librarians who are treated by their colleagues as if they need to “pay their dues” before they
and their ideas can be given consideration. I can’t imagine how quickly my passion for my work would have waned had my ideas been met with cynicism and dismissiveness.

This attitude is not only harmful to a new librarian’s morale, it also prevents the library from taking advantage of an opportunity to get a fresh perspective on what it does. There is a golden period when someone new to the library can see everything that might be strange, confusing, or problematic. In time, we all become accustomed to our surroundings, and those problems become the barely visible flotsam and jetsam of our everyday work. We should make the most of that magical newcomer vision. I always make a point of asking new colleagues to keep track of problems they see because those fresh insights can push us out of our comfort zones and create positive change for our patrons. We want to encourage these audacious ideas, even if they’re not all feasible. Read more…

 

14 Things That Impact The Quality Of Your Personal Brand

Quality and personal excellence are two key elements of your personal brand. The degree to which you fully embrace the importance of these elements is communicated to others on a continuous basis and is incorporated into others’ vision of who you are (i.e. the personal brand that you broadcast).

RELATED: The Perfect Recipe For A Great Personal Brand

Those who are fully aware of this fact can definitely undertake action to broadcast a personal brand that elevates their professionalism through conscious focus on quality and personal excellence.

Here are 14 things that impact the quality of your personal brand:

  • Every e-mail message you send to someone else.
  • Every voicemail message you leave for someone.
  • The voicemail message others hear when they try to reach you.
  • Your e-mail “signature.”
  • Read more…