How To Write A Stellar LinkedIn Summary

Leadership | Career advice | Social Media | Personal Branding

William Arruda July 09, 2017

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Several years ago, I posted an article on the three steps to writing the perfect LinkedIn summary. A lot has changed since then. LinkedIn has made many updates and revisions, and they recently launched an entirely new interface. In addition, the world of work has evolved even more into a place where the free-agent mindset is essential for prosperity. So it’s time for a major update to my last post on this topic.

Before we get into the mechanics of crafting a brilliant summary, let’s start with why your LinkedIn summary is so essential to your success:

• LinkedIn is often the first place people go when they are looking to evaluate you in a professional capacity.

• If people Google your name to learn about you, your LinkedIn profile is likely to show up in one of the top spots in the search results. Since 62% of Google clicks go to the top three search results, those who start at Google will end up at LinkedIn.

• For many of us, a LinkedIn profile is the most comprehensive bio we have on the web. Your LinkedIn summary (all 2,000 or fewer characters) will likely be read by more people than any other version of your bio . This added exposure gives you a great opportunity to capture the attention of decision makers — but only if you have a summary that connects.

An effective LinkedIn summary does three things: Read more…

10 Ways The Job Application Process Is Changing

 

 

10 Ways The Job Application Process Is Changing

1. Applicants Are Using E-Notes 

The job search application is becoming less formal and this trend has extended to cover letters. While I still recommend having a well-written one handy, sending a briefer and less formal version in the body of an email — an e-note — as opposed to attaching a separate document, is increasing in popularity and acceptance. One should still include interest, achievements and relevant skills.   – Emily Kapit, MS, MRW, ACRW, CPRWReFresh Your Step, LLC 

2. Job Ads Are Not Where You Put Your Energy 

It’s not all that new but the reality is that the online employment system is broken. Employers post job ads and then become overwhelmed with candidates who aren’t quite right. The real power lies in getting connected through LinkedIn LNKD +0.16%, colleagues, professional associations and network meetings. Figure out where you want to work and then create a job or tap an unadvertised position.   – Laura DeCarloCareer Directors international 

Read more…_

How To List Online Courses On Your Resume The Right Way (Because Yes, There Is A Wrong Way)

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So you’ve been taking some online courses. You’ve learned a ton, and you’ve even been using your new skills at work or to develop a side project.

But now you’re contemplating a career move and wondering how (and even whether) to include your continuing education on your resume. You’re right to approach this task thoughtfully. Online courses are still relatively new, recruiters can be skeptical and in certain cases, listing your online education can actually make your resume worse.

I spoke to several recruiters and hiring managers to gather insight on what they think when they see online courses listed on candidates’ resumes. So, whether you aced your marketing MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), killed it in coding bootcamp, or taught yourself graphic design, here are some of their tips on how to tell that story in your application:

1. Put Them In Their Proper Place

Across the board, the hiring managers and recruiters I spoke with agreed that MOOCs and other online courses can help make the case that you can do the job. However, they also think these classes shouldn’t be the star of the show. As Anne Lewis, the Director of Sales and Recruitment for Betts Recruiting, a firm specializing in recruitment for technology companies, told me, “In general, MOOCs can help to make candidate profiles stronger, especially junior candidates who don’t have as much experience.” Read more…

The LinkedIn Profile Checklist Every Job Seeker Needs Don Goodman November 12, 2015

Job searching has taken a new direction. It’s not about going to the job boards, finding the job opening you like, and then applying to it. That method will only have you waiting by the phone for a call that’s likely not going to happen. Today’s job seekers need to take a more proactive and interactive approach called job networking – and LinkedIn is a resource to help you do it.

Related: 6 Things Recruiters Want To See On Your LinkedIn Profile

When you’ve created an effective LinkedIn profile, it’ll help you get in front of the right contacts (recruiters, hiring managers, professionals in the field, etc.) who can lead you to the path of the next job opportunity. However, in order for it all to happen you do need a LinkedIn profile that communicates and displays the right information. Take a run through the LinkedIn Profile checklist below:

Present a Headline that talks to your target audience. Read more….

3 Reasons You Should Think Like A ‘Business-Of-One’ | CAREEREALISM

3 Reasons You Should Think Like A ‘Business-Of-One’ | CAREEREALISM.

3 Reasons Why You Should Think Like A ‘Business-Of-One’

YOUR INTRODUCTION, ELEVATOR SPEECH, AND ORIGIN STORY: FACE TO FACE NETWORKING TIPS

YOUR INTRODUCTION, ELEVATOR SPEECH, AND ORIGIN STORY: FACE TO FACE NETWORKING TIPS

by Ellen Mehling, Career Development Consultant, METRO

It is well-known that networking is vital to a successful job search and a thriving career. LinkedIn has made it easy to connect with a large number of people, but in-person interactions should not be neglected and should be conducted with thought and care. Those who have met you in person and who really know you and have worked with you in some way are going to be the most beneficial to you. These are the people who will refer, recommend, or even hire you. These first words and conversations with other professionals can make or break your opportunity for further contact.

Your Introduction

You will be remembered by the manner in which you introduce yourself, so choose those first words deliberately. Sometimes just your name, title, and workplace will suffice. And sometimes just your name and a general descriptive title (even just “librarian”) is appropriate, depending on the person or audience you are introducing yourself to.

In some cases, a few words describing what you do will be needed. If, for example, your title doesn’t make your job responsibilities clear or if there is a certain skill you want to be sure the person you are talking to knows about you, be sure to mention that too. If you are a student, give the name of the school and your degree-in-progress, with the possible addition of the kind of information work you hope to do following graduation.

It is best not to introduce yourself by saying you are unemployed or job hunting. I have heard many info pros begin their introduction with something like, “I was laid off two years ago…” We all have setbacks in our careers. By introducing yourself with a past setback you are telling other people that this one-time event, which may have occurred some time ago, has defined you in a permanent way. This encourages others to think of you as unemployed and that is not likely to lead to new opportunities. I would also avoid the phrase “in transition” as it has come to mean “long-term unemployed”.

Lead with your strengths; introduce yourself in the present tense, (“I am…” rather than “I was…”) and have some project or part-time job or volunteering or internship or blog or research or service in a professional organization that you can talk about later in the conversation. Keep your introduction to one or two sentences. After that, *listen* to the other person’s self-introduction and ask a follow-up question or two, to get things started. Read more…

 

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Networking Rules for Job-seekers: the Good, the Bad and the Almost Perfect | LinkedIn

Networking Rules for Job-seekers: the Good, the Bad and the Almost Perfect

Lou Adler

Lou Adler

CEO, best-selling author, created Performance-based Hiring. Recent book: The Essential Guide for Hiring & Getting Hired

Networking is about meeting people you know who can vouch for your past performance and connect you with people you don’t know.

After writing The Best Job-hunting Secrets of All Time, and reading the comments, I can safely conclude that 20% of job-seekers find networking necessary, appropriate, and comfortable. Another 20% find it necessary, but uncomfortable. The rest are either not doing it, or doing it wrong. (Note: I’ll be hosting a job-seeker webcast on Oct 10th discussing this and related topics.)

As many of you know I wrote a book, The Essential Guide for Hiring & Getting Hired, attempting to describe the hiring process from all perspectives: job-seekers (active and passive), recruiters (the good and bad), and hiring managers (the fully- and not-so-fully engaged). One theme of the book was to suggest that job-seekers need to take matters into their own hands when they find companies, recruiters or hiring managers using some flawed hiring process. The techniques in the book will not help you get a job you don’t deserve; they will only help you get one you do.

 

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