How To Write A Stellar LinkedIn Summary

Leadership | Career advice | Social Media | Personal Branding

William Arruda July 09, 2017

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Photo credit: Shutterstock

Several years ago, I posted an article on the three steps to writing the perfect LinkedIn summary. A lot has changed since then. LinkedIn has made many updates and revisions, and they recently launched an entirely new interface. In addition, the world of work has evolved even more into a place where the free-agent mindset is essential for prosperity. So it’s time for a major update to my last post on this topic.

Before we get into the mechanics of crafting a brilliant summary, let’s start with why your LinkedIn summary is so essential to your success:

• LinkedIn is often the first place people go when they are looking to evaluate you in a professional capacity.

• If people Google your name to learn about you, your LinkedIn profile is likely to show up in one of the top spots in the search results. Since 62% of Google clicks go to the top three search results, those who start at Google will end up at LinkedIn.

• For many of us, a LinkedIn profile is the most comprehensive bio we have on the web. Your LinkedIn summary (all 2,000 or fewer characters) will likely be read by more people than any other version of your bio . This added exposure gives you a great opportunity to capture the attention of decision makers — but only if you have a summary that connects.

An effective LinkedIn summary does three things: Read more…

Do Not Make a Career Decision Without This List

Career advice | Mentoring |Employment

by Shana Montesol Johnson

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Are you trying to figure out what your next career move should be? Do not make a career decision without a list of your core values.

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What Are Core Values?

Core values are the interests and qualities that you’ve always found yourself drawn to. Core values make us who we are.  When our work and life are aligned with them, we feel most fully ourselves and fully energized. We are naturally inclined toward our core values, and are eager to do them without making a lot of effort or setting a bunch of goals.

For example, some people love to repair or fix stuff – as kids, they took apart their toys only to put them back together, and as adults they still love tinkering in the garage.  “Repairing” is a value for them – they don’t have to force themselves to fix stuff, they just do it. Read more…

15 Ways To Get The Confidence Boost You Need At Work

Career advice | Mentoring | Coaching |Workplace

May 10, 2017 Forbes coaches Council

Competence, professionalism and interpersonal relationship skills are some of the crucial ingredients for workplace success, but they can only take you so far without self-confidence. If you’ve been feeling unsure of yourself at work lately or if you feel your skill set is no longer a match for your job requirements, you are in dire need of a confidence boost.

While self-assurance is not typically something we are born with, it can be built successfully by taking the right steps.

Below, 15 members of Forbes Coaches Council share their best advice to help you get the boost of confidence you need to fulfill your workplace potential.

1. Review Your Past Wins

Think of a past win or accomplishment and remember how good it felt to succeed, how effortlessly you were able to accomplish your goals, and how you have everything within you necessary to do it all over again. Confidence can build heavily on memory – if you lack confidence in a new opportunity or a new environment, remember what got you there in the first place. – Amanda Miller LittlejohnPackage Your Genius Academy 

2. Start By Noticing Your Inner Critic

Read more…

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All images courtesy of Forbes Council members.

Members of Forbes Coaches Council share advice on how to be more confident in the workplace.
Read More…

10 New Year’s Resolutions to Supercharge Your Career

Career Management

 

January is the perfect time to give your professional life a boost and set career goals for the coming year. Here are 10 of the best career resolutions to make, along with a few actionable tips on how to achieve them:

1. Perform an annual career checkup

Before you can set any career resolutions, the first step is to give your past year a detailed review. Use this time to assess whether you want to grow in your current role or hunt for a new one. If you’re thinking of using your talents elsewhere, these questions will help you assess what is working and what to look for in your next company. Here are some good questions to ask: Read article

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How to market yourself with a winning résumé

by Dennis McCafferty | 12-08-2016

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Are you one of the many executives who haven’t looked at their résumé in months … or years? Do you think it’s not necessary because you’re secure and happy with your current company and feel that revising your résumé would be a waste of time? Well, you may want to reassess your thinking, because career experts recommend that you review your résumé at least once a year. After all, résumés are often submitted as part of consideration for award nominations, guest bylines, speaking events at industry conference and partnership opportunities. It would also help to have a strong résumé in case your organization gets involved in a merger or acquisition. To this end, we’ve come up with the following best practices for résumés, which is adapted from an article by Lisa Rangel, titled “9 Executive Résumé Trends for 2017.” Founder of ResumeCheatSheet.com, Rangel is an executive résumé writer and official LinkedIn moderator at Chameleonresumes.com. Career Toolkit recently named her as one of the top 28 résumé writers. – See more at: http://www.cioinsight.com/it-management/careers/slideshows/how-to-market-yourself-with-a-winning-resume.html#sthash.pcWgX3Gw.dpuf

There Are Only 4 Types Of Career Problems

by J.T. O’Donnell

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CREDIT: Getty Images

Several times a day, the phone rings at our company with people calling to discuss their career problems. We get ten times as many emails each day from people writing in about their career problems. By phone or by email, they always start with, “I need to explain my story, it’s pretty complex…” And yet, here’s what they have in common:

  • All of them are experiencing a crisis of confidence.
  • They’re all frustrated and unhappy.
  • Each has a detailed account of what has led them to their current situation.
  • AND, every single one is also making the same (false) assumption about their situation.

It’s Not Rocket Science, You Shouldn’t Treat It That Way

Over 15 years ago, I started studying and working with people who felt unsatisfied in their careers. I’m a logic girl. I like process. I went to school for engineering. I decided to set out to build a system for finding greater career satisfaction. To do that, I realized I needed to be able to diagnose each person’s situation so a plan could be put in place. To the untrained ear, it might sound like each person has a highly complex career problem on their hands. But, after listening to a large quantity of career stories, I noticed they all fell into four categories. No matter what the complexity of the circumstances surrounding their particular career problem, it still boiled down to one of these four major challenges. Read more…

Know Bad Career Advice When You Hear It

by Robin Camarote

 Author, “Own It: Drive Your Career to a Place of Happiness and Success”

Generic advice often leads to more frustration than happiness

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CREDIT: Getty Images

Sometimes you immediately know when you’re getting bad advice. A coworker recently told me that right before her college graduation a family friend advised her to just get a good job- regardless of whether or not she enjoyed the work. He went on to say that she should work for ten years then quit and do something she loved. In the same conversation, someone else piped up and shared that he was cautioned to stay away from women because they ruin everything. They both laughed because they were able to know bad advice when you hear it.

But there are a couple of pithy pieces of professional advice that are better off on a poster then put into practice. Knowing the caveats and limitations of these good-sounding but ultimately bad pieces of career advice can save you time and frustration as you pursue your career.

  • Follow your passion. Unless your passion is project scheduling and detailed meeting notes, don’t let your passion be the sole arbiter in deciding what’s next in your career. The chances of making a decent living are slim, and the likelihood of realizing you don’t like your passion as much as you though are high. Instead, save time to pursue your passion on the side, and bring all of that positive energy to the other things you do.
  • Focus on one thing. Unless you’re a linebacker a week before the big game, you have many interests. You want to earn a living, build a reputation for doing great work, inspire others, and maybe save homeless dogs while having time to read, paint, run, and drink great coffee. Doing a bunch of different things makes life interesting. Instead of looking for one singular focus in your life or career, embrace the variety of things you’re interested in. Just avoid multi-tasking — it doesn’t work. From hour to hour in your day, do one thing at a time. Read more…