How To Write A Stellar LinkedIn Summary

Leadership | Career advice | Social Media | Personal Branding

William Arruda July 09, 2017

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Several years ago, I posted an article on the three steps to writing the perfect LinkedIn summary. A lot has changed since then. LinkedIn has made many updates and revisions, and they recently launched an entirely new interface. In addition, the world of work has evolved even more into a place where the free-agent mindset is essential for prosperity. So it’s time for a major update to my last post on this topic.

Before we get into the mechanics of crafting a brilliant summary, let’s start with why your LinkedIn summary is so essential to your success:

• LinkedIn is often the first place people go when they are looking to evaluate you in a professional capacity.

• If people Google your name to learn about you, your LinkedIn profile is likely to show up in one of the top spots in the search results. Since 62% of Google clicks go to the top three search results, those who start at Google will end up at LinkedIn.

• For many of us, a LinkedIn profile is the most comprehensive bio we have on the web. Your LinkedIn summary (all 2,000 or fewer characters) will likely be read by more people than any other version of your bio . This added exposure gives you a great opportunity to capture the attention of decision makers — but only if you have a summary that connects.

An effective LinkedIn summary does three things: Read more…

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from Le Monde

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Why hirers use social media to screen candidates

by Dennis McCafferty Posted 054-29-2016

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A growing number of CIOs and other hiring managers are screening job candidates by checking out their social media pages, according to a recent survey from CareerBuilder. These managers are also using search engines to research prospects—with many indicating that they’ll rule out applicants entirely if they couldn’t find any information about them online. Supervisors in the IT industry are most likely to turn to social media/search engines for research here, looking for details that supports candidates’ fitness for a vacancy as well as a professional online persona. A great deal of survey respondents admit that they’ve eliminated people from consideration based upon what they’ve found out about them online. As for the biggest deal-killers? These would include provocative/inappropriate photos and/or videos of the prospective hire, as well as the posting of discriminatory comments and any “bad mouthing” of an employer. “Tools such as Facebook and Twitter enable employers to get a glimpse of who candidates are outside the confines of a resume or cover letter,” said Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer of CareerBuilder. “And with more and more people using social media, it’s not unusual to see the usage for recruitment to grow as well.” More than 2,185 hiring managers and HR pros, as well as more than 3,030 workers, took part in the research, which was conducted by Harris Poll. – See more at: http://www.cioinsight.com/it-management/careers/slideshows/why-hirers-use-social-media-to-screen-candidates.html#sthash.a3jll3XB.dpuf

 

The LinkedIn Profile Checklist Every Job Seeker Needs Don Goodman November 12, 2015

Job searching has taken a new direction. It’s not about going to the job boards, finding the job opening you like, and then applying to it. That method will only have you waiting by the phone for a call that’s likely not going to happen. Today’s job seekers need to take a more proactive and interactive approach called job networking – and LinkedIn is a resource to help you do it.

Related: 6 Things Recruiters Want To See On Your LinkedIn Profile

When you’ve created an effective LinkedIn profile, it’ll help you get in front of the right contacts (recruiters, hiring managers, professionals in the field, etc.) who can lead you to the path of the next job opportunity. However, in order for it all to happen you do need a LinkedIn profile that communicates and displays the right information. Take a run through the LinkedIn Profile checklist below:

Present a Headline that talks to your target audience. Read more….

6 Changes You Should Make to Your Job Search by Hannah Morgan

It’s harder than ever to land a good job. So if you’re unemployed and searching for one, you’re probably frustrated. While employers cite many reasons why finding the right talent is nearly impossible, you can only control what you are doing (and not doing) to get on an their radar.

Here are a few things you should do differently to get more interviews.

1. Cut the time you spend on job boards. If you’re like most job seekers, you rely heavily on job boards and LinkedIn job postings as your primary sources to uncover job opportunities. This reactive approach is unlikely to result in an interview, because most employers rely on referrals to fill jobs with external candidates. And in reality, the majority of jobs are filled with internal candidates, and even if these positions were advertised, you wouldn’t stand a chance.

Job postings are great for mining information on the specific skills required for jobs. Postings can also help you identify potential employers (and competitors) who are known to hire for the types of jobs you are interested in. Once you’ve identified these companies, you can begin to find people you know or should know who work inside the company. This is how referrals happen.

Read more: http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2015/07/01/6-changes-you-should-make-to-your-job-search?src=usn_fb Networking is Networking is crucial during a job search, but you must take the time to build meaningful relationships.

Millennials: Here’s Why Employers Won’t Hire You And the Fix

Millennials: Here’s Why Employers Won’t Hire You (And the Fix)

MillennialsHey Millennials! Did you know employers are three times more likely to hire a mature worker than they are to hire you?

That’s right. According to a survey of recruiters, 60 percent of employers would rather hire mature workers, while only 20 percent would choose to hire Millennials. Why?

There are apparently several critical qualities employers said many Millennials lack. Let’s take a look at those, as well as what we Millennials can do to overcome those perceptions:

Mature Workers Associated with Increased Professionalism

Mature workers were considered reliable by 91 percent of employers and professional by 88 percent. For Millennial workers, only five percent of recruiters said they were professional and two percent said reliable.

To change this negative perception, you should deliberately focus on emphasizing your reliability. Talk about specific times in your career when others depended on you and you delivered. Additionally, it’s easy to show you’re professional by dressing the part and following up with the proper etiquette in emails and interviews. Read more…

 

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