10 Mistakes Job Seekers Make On Their LinkedIn Profiles

Forbes Coaches Council. | Dec 7, 2016

If it seems like everyone is on LinkedIn these days, it’s because they probably are. With the median number of years at one job at 4.years and 94% of recruiters using LinkedIn as a tool to vet candidates, it’s no wonder LinkedIn has become an active professional hub.

But don’t just slap your profile together and hope for the best. Below, members of Forbes Coaches Council discuss 10 common mistakes to be aware of so that you can rise above the competition.

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From left to right: Casey Carpenter, Adrienne Tom, Shannon Bradford, Julie Bondy Roberts, Cherly Lynch Simpson, Erin Kennedy, Mo Chanmugham, John O’Connor, Shauna C. Bryce, Leslie Mizerack. All photos courtesy of the individual members.

1. Writing Using ‘Resume-Speak Vs. Authentic Language’ 

A common mistake is to use canned “resume-speak” words that may be made up or overused. Why say, “Our cross-functional team implemented, proceduralized, and metricized our program under my leadership?” How about, “I lead the team that initiated the project, and we saw it through to completion. We came in ,000 under budget, three weeks prior to the deadline.”   – Casey CarpenterThe Sales Breakthrough Coach 

2. Content Misses The Mark 

Failing to demonstrate value to the target audience can cause confusion and lack of interest. To garner attention from prospective employers, job seekers must be selective and strategic in profile details, peppering in keywords and quantifiable evidence that is well-aligned with reader requirements. Robust details are great, but tailored content will boost visibility and reader retention.   – Adrienne TomCareer Impressions 

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What hiring managers are really trying to figure out when they ask, ‘What are your hobbies?’

Jacquelyn Smith May 9, 2016

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Jeff Hitchcock/flickr

Don’t just say, “I love photography.” Explain why.

When you’re in the hot seat interviewing for a job, you’re answering questions such as “What’s your greatest weakness?” and “Why should we hire you?” — so a query like “What are your hobbies?” will probably seem like a piece of cake.

But before you start babbling about your lifelong obsession with horses or your newfound passion for baking, consider this: The hiring manager wants to get a better sense of who you are, so it’s important to think about which hobbies best showcase your strengths, passions, and skills — and then discuss only those in the interview.

“The employer is trying to determine whether you’d be a good fit, and getting insight into your interests, hobbies, and personality all help in evaluating that,” says Amy Hoover, president of the job board Talent Zoo.

Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of “Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job,” agrees: “By learning more about your outside interests, they can glean more about your personality, and even draw some conclusions about how you may thrive in the organization.”

 

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Why hirers use social media to screen candidates

by Dennis McCafferty Posted 054-29-2016

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A growing number of CIOs and other hiring managers are screening job candidates by checking out their social media pages, according to a recent survey from CareerBuilder. These managers are also using search engines to research prospects—with many indicating that they’ll rule out applicants entirely if they couldn’t find any information about them online. Supervisors in the IT industry are most likely to turn to social media/search engines for research here, looking for details that supports candidates’ fitness for a vacancy as well as a professional online persona. A great deal of survey respondents admit that they’ve eliminated people from consideration based upon what they’ve found out about them online. As for the biggest deal-killers? These would include provocative/inappropriate photos and/or videos of the prospective hire, as well as the posting of discriminatory comments and any “bad mouthing” of an employer. “Tools such as Facebook and Twitter enable employers to get a glimpse of who candidates are outside the confines of a resume or cover letter,” said Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer of CareerBuilder. “And with more and more people using social media, it’s not unusual to see the usage for recruitment to grow as well.” More than 2,185 hiring managers and HR pros, as well as more than 3,030 workers, took part in the research, which was conducted by Harris Poll. – See more at: http://www.cioinsight.com/it-management/careers/slideshows/why-hirers-use-social-media-to-screen-candidates.html#sthash.a3jll3XB.dpuf

 

Things To Consider Before Accepting A Job Offer 7 Things You MUST Consider Before Accepting A Job by Ariella Coombs

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Before accepting a job, it’s important to understand a few things about the company (and about yourself). The last thing you want to do is take a job now only to leave in six months because you’re miserable. Here are some things you should think about before accepting that job offer:

1. Do I like the people I’d be working with at this company?

The truth is, you’re not going to get along with everybody, and no everybody is going to get along with you. However, it’s important to realize that you’ll be spending the majority of your days with your co-workers. While you don’t necessarily have to be buddy-buddy with them, you want to make sure you can at least get along so you can work together effectively.

Make an effort to get to know the people you’d be working with before moving too far into the hiring process. This will not only help you learn who they are and if you’d be able to get along with them, but it’ll also strengthen your network within that company. Having good relationships with people who work within your target companies can increase your chances of getting referred in. Read more…