The Next Generation of Librarians

Internships | Mentoring | Public librarians | Library School

June 22, 2017

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A librarian mentor talks with interns in a speed-mentoring round at the Public Library Association’s Inclusive Internship Initiative kickoff in Washington, D.C. Photo: Tracey Salazar

“How do you find a library and a position that fit your skill set and put you in a place where you will be happy?”

“How do you overcome the difficulties and hardships that come along the way?”

“Why are conversations about race so difficult?”

These were only some of the insightful questions asked by the 50 teenagers participating in the inaugural cohort of the Inclusive Internship Initiative (III). Made possible by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to the Public Library Association (PLA), the goal of III is to introduce high school juniors and seniors from a wide range of racial and ethnic backgrounds to careers in librarianship.

Equal parts academic seminar and career coaching, III’s kick-off event June 16 at the Library of Congress put library leaders on call to answer big questions. PLA President Felton Thomas opened by noting, “The traditional stereotype has been evolving for a number of years, but now more than ever, public libraries are providing services—summer lunches, passports, social services—that we couldn’t have imagined 10 years ago. Future librarians must understand that we are going through a generational transition of what it means to be a public librarian.”

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Ten Things That Are Worse For Your Career Than Getting Fired

Career advice | Employment | Job termination

by Liz Ryan | March 7, 2017

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Dear Liz,

I am in a sticky situation at work. I was transferred into this position against my will a year ago.

My supervisor “Vince” is the least popular supervisor in the company. Nobody transfers into his department voluntarily…..

Dear Cam,

If Vince terminates you, you will find out that getting fired is not a big deal, especially when you know it’s a personality conflict and nothing more……

Getting fired is not damaging to your career unless you believe it is.

Here are 10 things that are worse for your career than getting fired: [italics mine]

1. Staying in a job you hate only because you’re afraid of making a change.

2. Letting your co-workers down so many times that they stop trusting you, and building a bad reputation for yourself in the process.

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Ten Things I Couldn’t Care Less About When I’m Hiring

Hiring people is such an organic and human activity, it kills me to see how many companies do it badly. They try to make recruiting a linear, data-driven and analytical process, but that’s impossible, because recruiting is all about the energy that flows between and among people.

It has nothing to do with data. It has nothing to do with particles — like all human activities, it is all about waves!

Recruiting has nothing to do with keyword-searching algorithms. How sad it is to see how my HR profession has devolved!   Read more…

 

5 Hidden Costs Of Not Interning Before You Graduate

Guest post written by

Kaytie Zimmerman

I write about money and career for millennials at optimisticmillennial.com.

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Summer break for college students has finally arrived. They have plans to spend time at the beach, lake, or music festivals. Relaxation is important, but they may not realize that there are hidden costs if they don’t use this time to complete an internship before they graduate.

The costs are in the form of career potential, earnings, and time. All of these are important, but which are most significant to a new graduate?

Inability to Compete with Other Graduates

As students don their black robes and graduation caps this spring, they’ll enter a competitive pool of job seekers. Do you know how you stack up against your peers?

In 2014, 75% of graduates left school with at least one internship completed. Further, employers are now looking for work experience above other factors in selecting entry-level candidates.

It comes back to the all-too-painful chicken and egg reality most millennials have faced. They are told they need experience to get a job, but they need a job to get experience.

According to the Chronicle of Higher Education and the American Public Media’s Marketplace survey, internship experience is the single most important credential for recent graduates to have on their resume in their job search.

Adding an internship to your resume before you hit the real world will at least keep you on pace with your peers, if not give you an edge.

Lose Out on ‘Foot in the Door’ Opportunities

Most job seekers are familiar with online job submissions being referred to as the “black hole” where their resume disappears, never to be found again.

One of the ways to get a foot in the door to your first job is to find an internship at a company that regularly hires their interns as full-time employees.  Read more…

What hiring managers are really trying to figure out when they ask, ‘What are your hobbies?’

Jacquelyn Smith May 9, 2016

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Jeff Hitchcock/flickr

Don’t just say, “I love photography.” Explain why.

When you’re in the hot seat interviewing for a job, you’re answering questions such as “What’s your greatest weakness?” and “Why should we hire you?” — so a query like “What are your hobbies?” will probably seem like a piece of cake.

But before you start babbling about your lifelong obsession with horses or your newfound passion for baking, consider this: The hiring manager wants to get a better sense of who you are, so it’s important to think about which hobbies best showcase your strengths, passions, and skills — and then discuss only those in the interview.

“The employer is trying to determine whether you’d be a good fit, and getting insight into your interests, hobbies, and personality all help in evaluating that,” says Amy Hoover, president of the job board Talent Zoo.

Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of “Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job,” agrees: “By learning more about your outside interests, they can glean more about your personality, and even draw some conclusions about how you may thrive in the organization.”

 

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The LinkedIn Profile Checklist Every Job Seeker Needs Don Goodman November 12, 2015

Job searching has taken a new direction. It’s not about going to the job boards, finding the job opening you like, and then applying to it. That method will only have you waiting by the phone for a call that’s likely not going to happen. Today’s job seekers need to take a more proactive and interactive approach called job networking – and LinkedIn is a resource to help you do it.

Related: 6 Things Recruiters Want To See On Your LinkedIn Profile

When you’ve created an effective LinkedIn profile, it’ll help you get in front of the right contacts (recruiters, hiring managers, professionals in the field, etc.) who can lead you to the path of the next job opportunity. However, in order for it all to happen you do need a LinkedIn profile that communicates and displays the right information. Take a run through the LinkedIn Profile checklist below:

Present a Headline that talks to your target audience. Read more….

12 Choices to Help You Step Back From Burnout by Vicki Davis

Author Vicki Davis surrounds herself with sayings and thoughts to help her stay positive. Photo credit: Vicki Davis

“Our very lives are fashioned by choice. First we make choices. Then our choices make us.” – Anne Frank

A tired teacher is a powder keg waiting for a match. In my bouts with burnout, I’ve learned that stepping back from the brink is about choice. These 12 choices have helped me recover and be a better teacher for my students.

Choice #1: Choose to Be Happy

First, happiness is a choice. Choose to be the first one to smile at everybody you meet. Choose to greet your students by name.

Use happy triggers to boost your mood when you get upset. I have a Pinterest Board called Happy Thoughts and another called Things That Make Me Laugh. The “Atta Girl” folder in my desk holds nice notes.

Choice #2: Choose to Disconnect

We are making a dumb use of our smartphones. Instead of freeing us up to go anywhere anytime, they’ve tethered us to a hamster wheel. Usually, I check email twice a day. I deleted my school email off my smartphone after several evenings because of an angry email. (We all get them.) Unplug once a week. Be a human being, not a human doing.

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