Spring event: Albertine Books talk, tour and dinner

Event | Networking | Professional Organization

Please join the New York Library Club for our Spring Event at Albertine.

WHEN:
Monday April 29, 2019, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

WHERE:
Albertine,  972 5th Ave, (bet. East 78th and 79th Streets) New York, NY 10075

DETAILS:

A guided tour (free) of the two-floor Albertine with an opportunity to browse the shop. The event will be followed by an informal gathering at a nearby café (at cost).

Albertine

Albertine is part of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy and is located inside the historic landmarked Payne Whitney mansion designed by Stanford White. As indicated on their website, it is “the only bookshop in New York devoted solely to books in French and English with more than 14,000 contemporary and classic titles from 30 French-speaking countries.”  The store regularly hosts authors, debates and discussions open to the public at no charge. Since 2017 the Cultural Services has awarded the Albertine Prize for American readers’ favorite work of contemporary Francophone fiction that has been translated into English.

We will be greeted by the Assistant Director who will explain the history, design and decor of the shop and answer any questions.

Cost/RSVP:
None for the tour. Please RSVP no later than April 26th by replying to this email or at the following link:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/nylc-spring-event-tour-of-the-albertine-bookstore-tickets-60368102620

All are welcome. Please distribute this invitation widely.

wikiHow to Network at a Conference

Conferences | Networking | Career advice

Conferences provide excellent business opportunities if you know how to network effectively. At a conference with dozens or hundreds of people, it’s difficult to know where to start. Go in with the intention of making several meaningful connections instead of trying to meet every person or impress the big names. When you leave the conference, you’ll have a list of people with whom you can continue building strong business relationships.

aid331969-v4-728px-network-at-a-conference-step-01

Have concrete goals in mind. You can’t talk to everyone at a conference, so it’s a good idea to go in knowing what you want to get out of it. Do you hope to find an “in” that will eventually lead to a job offer? Do you want to garner more business for your company? Perhaps you simply want to meet people in your line of work and foster a deeper connection with others in your industry.

  • Your goals will influence which panels you attend and which people you seek to meet. Instead of just going with the flow, plan out your time so you’re utilizing each hour to work toward your goals.
  • Remember that you’ll be more successful if you’re open to other people’s pitches instead of just trying to push your own agenda on people. Getting to know people is a good goal in and of itself, since it leads to long-term relationships that just don’t happen if you’re tossing out as many business cards as possible without taking time to have real conversations.

Read more…

ALA Code of Ethics 1: What’s in a code? | Podcast

Libraries | Ethics | Professional conduct

screenshot-2017-09-23-17-18-19

Here’s BLL Season 2, Episode 2, In which I introduce my 3-part (though actually it’ll probably be 4 parts) series on the ALA Code of Ethics. What is the code? What are its implications in our daily lives as leaders? Just how blatant of a smart aleck will I be during my dramatic reading of the code?

Link to episode transcript

Links:

American Library Association Code of Ethics

FREE Course on Mastering Difficult Conversations

 

Join the conversation

Rate and review the show

Sharing learning from an inspiring professional career

Mentoring | Coaching | Leadership | Management | Academic Libraries

by Kerry Parry 31 August 2017

sharing_learning_banner

Kathryn Parry interviews Sue Hodges, former Director of Libraries and Archives, Bangor University. Sue talks about her career path, and her belief that with confidence and support you can go further than you might think, and achieve the career that you really want.

AS I start my new job as CILIP Wales Development Manager, I am making many new connections. I am struck by how many of these connections are with people who are at the opposite end of the career ladder to me. I see many experienced professionals retiring, but I cannot see much ­evidence of succession planning. How do we learn and carry forward the services these professionals have created? I want to hear how other professionals started out, what shaped their career and any advice they can give.

To gain more understanding of these issues, I recently interviewed Sue ­Hodges, who has just retired from her role as ­Director of Libraries and Archives at Bangor University. We talked about how her career developed, and how she aims to share what she has learnt over the years by mentoring and supporting people in their career plans.

Kathryn: How did you get into librarianship? 

Read more…

The Next Generation of Librarians

Internships | Mentoring | Public librarians | Library School

June 22, 2017

pla2017iii

A librarian mentor talks with interns in a speed-mentoring round at the Public Library Association’s Inclusive Internship Initiative kickoff in Washington, D.C. Photo: Tracey Salazar

“How do you find a library and a position that fit your skill set and put you in a place where you will be happy?”

“How do you overcome the difficulties and hardships that come along the way?”

“Why are conversations about race so difficult?”

These were only some of the insightful questions asked by the 50 teenagers participating in the inaugural cohort of the Inclusive Internship Initiative (III). Made possible by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to the Public Library Association (PLA), the goal of III is to introduce high school juniors and seniors from a wide range of racial and ethnic backgrounds to careers in librarianship.

Equal parts academic seminar and career coaching, III’s kick-off event June 16 at the Library of Congress put library leaders on call to answer big questions. PLA President Felton Thomas opened by noting, “The traditional stereotype has been evolving for a number of years, but now more than ever, public libraries are providing services—summer lunches, passports, social services—that we couldn’t have imagined 10 years ago. Future librarians must understand that we are going through a generational transition of what it means to be a public librarian.”

Read more…

Member of the Week: Susanne M. Markgren

Mentoring | ACRL | Career development | Influencer

Susanne M. Markgren is the assistant director for technical services at Manhattan College in Riverdale, New York. Susanne first joined ACRL in 2008 and is your ACRL member of the week for May 15, 2017.

susanne-markgren-759x1024

1. Describe yourself in three words: Adaptable, inquisitive, resilient.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I’m currently obsessed with short stories, and I’m alternating between these three amazing collections: Joy Williams’ The Visiting Privilege, Lucia Berlin’s A Manual for Cleaning Women, and Clarice Lispector’s Complete Stories.

In the car and on walks, I like to listen to The Moth Radio Hour, or The Moth Podcast. True stories, well told. Totally addictive.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Scalable, motivational, community.

Read article

Note: Stephanie Gross has been a mentor with ACRL/NY since the Mentoring Program’s inception. For more information concerning Susanne and the mentoring program:

Susanne Markgren
ACRL/NY Mentoring Program Coordinator
email: acrlnymentoring@gmail.com
http://acrlny.org/