wikiHow to Network at a Conference

Conferences | Networking | Career advice

Conferences provide excellent business opportunities if you know how to network effectively. At a conference with dozens or hundreds of people, it’s difficult to know where to start. Go in with the intention of making several meaningful connections instead of trying to meet every person or impress the big names. When you leave the conference, you’ll have a list of people with whom you can continue building strong business relationships.

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Have concrete goals in mind. You can’t talk to everyone at a conference, so it’s a good idea to go in knowing what you want to get out of it. Do you hope to find an “in” that will eventually lead to a job offer? Do you want to garner more business for your company? Perhaps you simply want to meet people in your line of work and foster a deeper connection with others in your industry.

  • Your goals will influence which panels you attend and which people you seek to meet. Instead of just going with the flow, plan out your time so you’re utilizing each hour to work toward your goals.
  • Remember that you’ll be more successful if you’re open to other people’s pitches instead of just trying to push your own agenda on people. Getting to know people is a good goal in and of itself, since it leads to long-term relationships that just don’t happen if you’re tossing out as many business cards as possible without taking time to have real conversations.

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How to say no at work | Employer

Employment | Communication in the workplace | Career advice

by Reuben Yonatan, founder and CEO of GetVoIP | Undercover Recruiter

Perhaps the most important skill to learn at work is prioritization. By taking on some projects and declining others, it is possible to control your work quality more effectively, something that is absolutely crucial.

But learning when and how to say no is something particularly difficult in an American professional climate where people tend to be boastful about overwork to an unhealthy degree.

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Décodex : notre kit pour dénicher les fausses informations

Fact checker | Journalism | Alternative News

from Le Monde

by AdrienSenecat on Scribd

Why hirers use social media to screen candidates

by Dennis McCafferty Posted 054-29-2016

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A growing number of CIOs and other hiring managers are screening job candidates by checking out their social media pages, according to a recent survey from CareerBuilder. These managers are also using search engines to research prospects—with many indicating that they’ll rule out applicants entirely if they couldn’t find any information about them online. Supervisors in the IT industry are most likely to turn to social media/search engines for research here, looking for details that supports candidates’ fitness for a vacancy as well as a professional online persona. A great deal of survey respondents admit that they’ve eliminated people from consideration based upon what they’ve found out about them online. As for the biggest deal-killers? These would include provocative/inappropriate photos and/or videos of the prospective hire, as well as the posting of discriminatory comments and any “bad mouthing” of an employer. “Tools such as Facebook and Twitter enable employers to get a glimpse of who candidates are outside the confines of a resume or cover letter,” said Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer of CareerBuilder. “And with more and more people using social media, it’s not unusual to see the usage for recruitment to grow as well.” More than 2,185 hiring managers and HR pros, as well as more than 3,030 workers, took part in the research, which was conducted by Harris Poll. – See more at: http://www.cioinsight.com/it-management/careers/slideshows/why-hirers-use-social-media-to-screen-candidates.html#sthash.a3jll3XB.dpuf

 

What Do Your Employees Really Think of You?

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Trustworthiness is an essential quality workers expect from their managers, according to a recent survey that focused on workers and their managers.

 

 

Workers generally give their managers high marks on a wide variety of needed performance measures, according to a recent survey from Instructure. Overall, they feel that their bosses are effective at expressing industry knowledge and expertise, while cultivating a collaborative culture. Managers are also giving timely and constructive feedback, while establishing transparency about department and company developments. The latter point remains critical, as the vast majority of workers rank trustworthiness among the most essential qualities of managers. In addition, they value managers who are creative while taking the time to train staffers on needed job skills. The findings convey a generally positive state-of-mind among today’s professionals, as most of them feel secure in their jobs and say that all of their talents and skills are put to use at work. In addition, they say they receive recognition when they do good work, and like working for their employers. A total of 1,050 U.S. employees took part in the research.

Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

– See more at: http://www.cioinsight.com/it-management/careers/slideshows/what-do-your-employees-really-think-of-you.html#sthash.30E1jjzg.dpuf

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MarketMeSuite – MarketMeSuite 17 LinkedIn Profile Must Haves [infographic]

This year has been a big one for LinkedIn. With new features like the Creative Portfolio Display, you now have the ability to visually showcase your professional portfolio. But before diving any deeper with the latest add-ons, does your LinkedIn profile have all the elements that will help you rise to the top? MarketMeSuite teamed up with Maximize Social Business.com’s Neal Schaffer to bring you this new infographic with all the tips you need to elevate your LinkedIn profile: 17 LinkedIn Profile Must-Haves!  Everyone can use great tips, so please share the LinkedIn love!

LinkedIn infographic

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New PEW: Younger Americans’ Library Habits and Expectations – Stephen’s Lighthouse

New PEW: Younger Americans’ Library Habits and Expectations – Stephen’s Lighthouse.

Younger Americans’ Library Habits and Expectations

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Summary of Findings

http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/06/25/younger-americans-library-services/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=younger-americans-library-services

Younger Americans—those ages 16-29—exhibit a fascinating mix of habits and preferences when it comes to reading, libraries, and technology. Almost all Americans under age 30 are online, and they are more likely than older patrons to use libraries’ computer and internet connections; however, they are also still closely bound to print, as three-quarters (75%) of younger Americans say they have read at least one book in print in the past year, compared with 64% of adults ages 30 and older.

Similarly, younger Americans’ library usage reflect a blend of traditional and technological services. Americans under age 30 are just as likely as older adults to visit the library, and once there they borrow print books and browse the shelves at similar rates. Large majorities of those under age 30 say it is  “very important” for libraries to have librarians as well as books for borrowing, and relatively few think that libraries should automate most library services, move most services online, or move print books out of public areas.

At the same time, younger library visitors are more likely than older patrons to access the library’s internet or computers or use the library’s research resources, such as databases. And younger patrons are also significantly more likely than those ages 30 and older to use the library as a study or “hang out” space: 60% of younger patrons say they go to the library to study, sit and read, or watch or listen to media, significantly more than the 45% of older patrons who do this. And a majority of Americans of all age groups say libraries should have more comfortable spaces for reading, working, and relaxing. Read more….