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from Le Monde

by AdrienSenecat on Scribd

Why hirers use social media to screen candidates

by Dennis McCafferty Posted 054-29-2016

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A growing number of CIOs and other hiring managers are screening job candidates by checking out their social media pages, according to a recent survey from CareerBuilder. These managers are also using search engines to research prospects—with many indicating that they’ll rule out applicants entirely if they couldn’t find any information about them online. Supervisors in the IT industry are most likely to turn to social media/search engines for research here, looking for details that supports candidates’ fitness for a vacancy as well as a professional online persona. A great deal of survey respondents admit that they’ve eliminated people from consideration based upon what they’ve found out about them online. As for the biggest deal-killers? These would include provocative/inappropriate photos and/or videos of the prospective hire, as well as the posting of discriminatory comments and any “bad mouthing” of an employer. “Tools such as Facebook and Twitter enable employers to get a glimpse of who candidates are outside the confines of a resume or cover letter,” said Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer of CareerBuilder. “And with more and more people using social media, it’s not unusual to see the usage for recruitment to grow as well.” More than 2,185 hiring managers and HR pros, as well as more than 3,030 workers, took part in the research, which was conducted by Harris Poll. – See more at: http://www.cioinsight.com/it-management/careers/slideshows/why-hirers-use-social-media-to-screen-candidates.html#sthash.a3jll3XB.dpuf

 

What Do Your Employees Really Think of You?

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Trustworthiness is an essential quality workers expect from their managers, according to a recent survey that focused on workers and their managers.

 

 

Workers generally give their managers high marks on a wide variety of needed performance measures, according to a recent survey from Instructure. Overall, they feel that their bosses are effective at expressing industry knowledge and expertise, while cultivating a collaborative culture. Managers are also giving timely and constructive feedback, while establishing transparency about department and company developments. The latter point remains critical, as the vast majority of workers rank trustworthiness among the most essential qualities of managers. In addition, they value managers who are creative while taking the time to train staffers on needed job skills. The findings convey a generally positive state-of-mind among today’s professionals, as most of them feel secure in their jobs and say that all of their talents and skills are put to use at work. In addition, they say they receive recognition when they do good work, and like working for their employers. A total of 1,050 U.S. employees took part in the research.

Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

– See more at: http://www.cioinsight.com/it-management/careers/slideshows/what-do-your-employees-really-think-of-you.html#sthash.30E1jjzg.dpuf

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MarketMeSuite – MarketMeSuite 17 LinkedIn Profile Must Haves [infographic]

This year has been a big one for LinkedIn. With new features like the Creative Portfolio Display, you now have the ability to visually showcase your professional portfolio. But before diving any deeper with the latest add-ons, does your LinkedIn profile have all the elements that will help you rise to the top? MarketMeSuite teamed up with Maximize Social Business.com’s Neal Schaffer to bring you this new infographic with all the tips you need to elevate your LinkedIn profile: 17 LinkedIn Profile Must-Haves!  Everyone can use great tips, so please share the LinkedIn love!

LinkedIn infographic

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New PEW: Younger Americans’ Library Habits and Expectations – Stephen’s Lighthouse

New PEW: Younger Americans’ Library Habits and Expectations – Stephen’s Lighthouse.

Younger Americans’ Library Habits and Expectations

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Summary of Findings

http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/06/25/younger-americans-library-services/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=younger-americans-library-services

Younger Americans—those ages 16-29—exhibit a fascinating mix of habits and preferences when it comes to reading, libraries, and technology. Almost all Americans under age 30 are online, and they are more likely than older patrons to use libraries’ computer and internet connections; however, they are also still closely bound to print, as three-quarters (75%) of younger Americans say they have read at least one book in print in the past year, compared with 64% of adults ages 30 and older.

Similarly, younger Americans’ library usage reflect a blend of traditional and technological services. Americans under age 30 are just as likely as older adults to visit the library, and once there they borrow print books and browse the shelves at similar rates. Large majorities of those under age 30 say it is  “very important” for libraries to have librarians as well as books for borrowing, and relatively few think that libraries should automate most library services, move most services online, or move print books out of public areas.

At the same time, younger library visitors are more likely than older patrons to access the library’s internet or computers or use the library’s research resources, such as databases. And younger patrons are also significantly more likely than those ages 30 and older to use the library as a study or “hang out” space: 60% of younger patrons say they go to the library to study, sit and read, or watch or listen to media, significantly more than the 45% of older patrons who do this. And a majority of Americans of all age groups say libraries should have more comfortable spaces for reading, working, and relaxing. Read more….

SLJ’s 2013 Job Satisfaction Survey | What’s Not to Love? By Laura Girmscheid on May 6, 2013

.Chart Designs by Mark Tuchman.

Igniting a love for reading is primarily what drives job satisfaction for librarians who work with teens. And satisfied they are—seven out of ten school media specialists and public librarians working directly with children and/or teens report they are either satisfied or very satisfied with their jobs. SLJ set out to learn more about the motivations and challenges in the profession in a recent national job satisfaction survey of just over 1,000 school and public librarians. Read more….

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