Why Constant Learners All Embrace the 5-Hour Rule

Productivity | Live-long learning | Constant learning | Management

By Michael Simmons (Empact)

Benjamin Franklin did this 1 hour a day, 5 hours a week. Why you should do it too.

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CREDIT: Getty Images

This is a post from Michael Simmons, co-founder of Empact.

With Ian Chew

At the age of 10, Benjamin Franklin left formal schooling to become an apprentice to his father. As a teenager, he showed no particular talent or aptitude aside from his love of books.

When he died a little over half a century later, he was America’s most respected statesman, its most famous inventor, a prolific author, and a successful entrepreneur.

What happened between these two points to cause such a meteoric rise? Read more…

Underlying the answer to this question is a success strategy for life that we can all use, and increasingly must use.

The five-hour rule:
Read more…
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These Uncomfortable Deeds Will Pay Off Forever

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May 22, 2016

Dr. Travis Bradberry

T.S. Eliot was clearly onto something when he asked, “If you aren’t in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?” The very act of stepping outside of your comfort zone is critical to your success and well-being.

Our brains are wired such that it’s difficult to take action until we feel at least some stress and discomfort. In fact, performance peaks when we’re well out of our comfort zone. If you’re too comfortable your performance suffers from inaction, and if you move too far outside of your comfort zone you melt down from stress.

Peak performance and discomfort go hand in hand. Stepping outside of your comfort zone makes you better, and it doesn’t have to be something as extreme as climbing Mount Everest. It’s the everyday challenges that push your boundaries the most, none of which require a flight to Nepal. Step out of your comfort zone and embrace these challenges.

Read more…