Emerging Trends in Libraries for 2016 Stephen Abram, MLS

15 Apps to Make You an Awesome Intern

15 Apps to Make You an Awesome Intern

Apps for InternsWant to be the best intern, ever? There’s an app for that.

Technically, there are tons of apps to keep you organized, sharp, and constantly learning—everything you need to impress your new boss. And all most all of them are free!

So, grab your smartphone and start using it for exactly what it was meant to do– to help you become an awesome intern!

Get Organized

1. Evernote (Cost: Free)
Evernote is a great way to remember all those important ideas (and instructions!) you can’t afford to forget. Stay on top of your internship duties with notes, snapshots, and recorded voice reminders.

2. Workflowy (Free)
Love making a list and crossing things off? This streamlined app is for you. With hashtags, filters, and great search functionality, Workflowy helps you create the world’s coolest To-Do list.
3. Remember the Milk (Free)
Organize and prioritize your internship tasks with Remember the Milk—or, in your case, Remember the 1,000 Things You Need To Do Before Wednesday. You can set due dates, add notes, postpone or repeat tasks, and even print relevant checklists. Read more…

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40 Great Apps for Mobile Reference and Outreach | American Libraries Magazine

40 Great Apps for Mobile Reference and OutreachBy Sanhita SinhaRoy

via 40 Great Apps for Mobile Reference and Outreach | American Libraries Magazine.

Mobile phone apps

The desire to learn about useful mobile apps is rampant among librarians, judging by the overflow crowd at Sunday’s Conversation Starter billed to deliver ““40 Great Apps for Mobile Reference and Outreach.”

More than 200 conference-goers packed the small room booked for the session, with many peering through the doorway and sitting on the floor. During their presentation, branch manager Richard Le and adult services librarian Mel Gooch, both from San Francisco Public Library, shared what they have found to be dozens of apps that provide innovative services, useful mobile content, and opportunities for outreach.

Here’s the full list of the 40 apps they discussed, as well as some suggestions Le and Gooch provided for ways in which librarians can explore and integrate them into their library’s mobile strategy. They range from the more obvious (Amazon, Google Maps, and Dropbox) to the more obscure (EasyBib, SitOrSquat, and SportsTap). Most are compatible with both Android and iOS (Apple) devices, and all are free unless otherwise noted: Read more….

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Library Learning Goes Online – YouTube

American Libraries Live—online learning is changing the way schools work. From elementary to graduate school to continuing education, online tools are creating new horizons in distance learning and new tools to supplement in-person learning. But what does this mean for libraries?

Sarah Steiner, Social Work and Virtual Services Librarian at Georgia State University Library will lead our expert panel:

  • John Shank, Instructional Design Librarian and Associate Director of the Center for Learning and Teaching at Penn State University
  • Lauren Pressley, Head of Instruction at Wake Forest University Libraries

Don’t Leave College Without These 10 Digital Skills

Graduation season is upon us, and that means college graduates everywhere are preparing to enter “the real world.” But chances are your liberal arts degree, as hard-earned and valuable as it is, doesn’t equip you with every digital skill you need.

We’ve put together a short list of fundamental skills that every college graduate should possess, from simply branding yourself online to learning basic coding. They’re guaranteed to increase your overall digital know-how, and you can learn them all on your own.

Did you graduate college a long time ago, or never attended? Don’t worry — it’s never too late to learn these skills. They’re useful to anyone.

1. Setting Up a Wi-Fi Network

These days, most students are lucky enough to go to colleges that already have wireless Internet set up in the dorms. By simply typing in a password on the provided network, the web magically appears on your laptop. But once you graduate, that’s no longer the case. To save yourself from this harsh reality, learn what it takes to get working Wi-Fi: setting up the modem, launching a new network and researching local companies and pricing.

Read more…

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