Personal archiving : preserving our digital heritage Ed. Donald T. Hawkins | review

Personal archives | Digital preservation | Electronic records managment

Reviewer: Stephanie L. Gross, MSLIS


Personal archiving : preserving our digital heritagePersonal archiving : preserving our digital heritage by Donald T. Hawkins
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Reviewer bio:

I am an academic librarian whose primary responsibility is to oversee the electronic reserves component of Springshare LibGuides. Recently I was appointed to serve on the task group to explore, report and advice the establishment of an institutional repository at my university. Having already read much literature concerning IR, I have begun widening my reading to include material that examines IR and its various components from a variety of viewpoints, academic, technical and personal.

Review:

This book is an anthology created by specialists in libraries, archives and technology. It is a rich, yet succinct, volume compiled as a primer for lay individuals who are involved in archiving personal material. Much of the focus is on preserving, organizing and sharing memorabilia. However, true to expectation, an equal emphasis is given to the preservation of digital files from various formats. Some attention is devoted to records management, although that is from a more introductory, philosophical perspective. What I believe to be the strength of this work is its practical advice to both lay and professionals alike. It is specific and technical enough to satisfy academic librarians who are not trained as archivists. Often we are tasked with aiding and guiding library users (students and faculty) in the preservation of their personal data. Those who are interested in understanding specific aspects of establishing and maintaining an institutional repository, including the compilation and promotion of best practices will certainly need to research further. However, this handbook does indeed list and annotate various resources (e.g. Library of Congress, Internet Archives) which is extremely helpful. There are two chapters dedicated to the preservation of email from faculty, scholars and researchers. Much is made of the chronic conundrum of “store and ignore”, benign negligence, concerning the backing up of files and precious data. The mandate to keep up with current technology, upgrading equipment and the appropriate hardware and software is underscored. (A pitch for able institutions to take on this responsibility is made, especially regarding work by scholars and communities.) Budgeting is given sufficient space to gain an appreciation of the magnitude of the demands on resources, both monetary and human. The final chapters look into the future, including intelligent discussions and projections relating to issues of ownership, copyright and social media. Although various software firms and websites are mentioned by name and have already disappeared by the time of this writing, their absence does not diminish the usefulness of their mention. The principles and philosophy of the services remain valid into the present.

Recommended audience:

Public libraries, academic libraries, special libraries, archives, museums

Recommended added subject heading:

Institutional repositories.
Digital libraries.

View all my reviews

Why Constant Learners All Embrace the 5-Hour Rule

Productivity | Live-long learning | Constant learning | Management

By Michael Simmons (Empact)

Benjamin Franklin did this 1 hour a day, 5 hours a week. Why you should do it too.

gettyimages-187969754-web_77957

CREDIT: Getty Images

This is a post from Michael Simmons, co-founder of Empact.

With Ian Chew

At the age of 10, Benjamin Franklin left formal schooling to become an apprentice to his father. As a teenager, he showed no particular talent or aptitude aside from his love of books.

When he died a little over half a century later, he was America’s most respected statesman, its most famous inventor, a prolific author, and a successful entrepreneur.

What happened between these two points to cause such a meteoric rise? Read more…

Underlying the answer to this question is a success strategy for life that we can all use, and increasingly must use.

The five-hour rule:
Read more…

Emerging Trends in Libraries for 2016 Stephen Abram, MLS

15 Apps to Make You an Awesome Intern

15 Apps to Make You an Awesome Intern

Apps for InternsWant to be the best intern, ever? There’s an app for that.

Technically, there are tons of apps to keep you organized, sharp, and constantly learning—everything you need to impress your new boss. And all most all of them are free!

So, grab your smartphone and start using it for exactly what it was meant to do– to help you become an awesome intern!

Get Organized

1. Evernote (Cost: Free)
Evernote is a great way to remember all those important ideas (and instructions!) you can’t afford to forget. Stay on top of your internship duties with notes, snapshots, and recorded voice reminders.

2. Workflowy (Free)
Love making a list and crossing things off? This streamlined app is for you. With hashtags, filters, and great search functionality, Workflowy helps you create the world’s coolest To-Do list.
3. Remember the Milk (Free)
Organize and prioritize your internship tasks with Remember the Milk—or, in your case, Remember the 1,000 Things You Need To Do Before Wednesday. You can set due dates, add notes, postpone or repeat tasks, and even print relevant checklists. Read more…

Enhanced by Zemanta

40 Great Apps for Mobile Reference and Outreach | American Libraries Magazine

40 Great Apps for Mobile Reference and OutreachBy Sanhita SinhaRoy

via 40 Great Apps for Mobile Reference and Outreach | American Libraries Magazine.

Mobile phone apps

The desire to learn about useful mobile apps is rampant among librarians, judging by the overflow crowd at Sunday’s Conversation Starter billed to deliver ““40 Great Apps for Mobile Reference and Outreach.”

More than 200 conference-goers packed the small room booked for the session, with many peering through the doorway and sitting on the floor. During their presentation, branch manager Richard Le and adult services librarian Mel Gooch, both from San Francisco Public Library, shared what they have found to be dozens of apps that provide innovative services, useful mobile content, and opportunities for outreach.

Here’s the full list of the 40 apps they discussed, as well as some suggestions Le and Gooch provided for ways in which librarians can explore and integrate them into their library’s mobile strategy. They range from the more obvious (Amazon, Google Maps, and Dropbox) to the more obscure (EasyBib, SitOrSquat, and SportsTap). Most are compatible with both Android and iOS (Apple) devices, and all are free unless otherwise noted: Read more….

Enhanced by Zemanta

Library Learning Goes Online – YouTube

American Libraries Live—online learning is changing the way schools work. From elementary to graduate school to continuing education, online tools are creating new horizons in distance learning and new tools to supplement in-person learning. But what does this mean for libraries?

Sarah Steiner, Social Work and Virtual Services Librarian at Georgia State University Library will lead our expert panel:

  • John Shank, Instructional Design Librarian and Associate Director of the Center for Learning and Teaching at Penn State University
  • Lauren Pressley, Head of Instruction at Wake Forest University Libraries