Designing Better Libraries » Service Does Matter In Higher Education

Though slow to come around, the signs indicate that there is an increased awareness in higher education that the quality of services delivered does matter. When students are behaving more like traditional consumers who comparison shop before making a purchase decision, colleges and universities may want to develop a reputation for delivering great customer experiences. Whether it’s the online registration process, managing student loans and assisting with financial aid or resolving an overdue book issue in the library, students are increasingly attuned to the quality of these experiences – and when it’s subpar they may broadcast it on their social networks. I know I want my institution’s students to be telling each other about the great experience they had in interaction with the library. Read more..

Join the Association of Jewish Libraries in Houston 2013! – YouTube

Come on down to the 48th Annual AJL Conference in Houston!

June 16-19

The preliminary schedule is now available at http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/Events.aspx

Participate in roundtable discussions, learn about Library of Congress updates, OCLC updates, automation options, the Abraham Joshua Heschel archive, the Shel Silverstein Archive, Cairo Genizah, tweeting, skyping, chatting and more!

Early Bird Registration by April 16:  $485

Mail-in or online registration available at http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/Events.aspx

Come on down to the 48th Annual AJL Conference in Houston!

June 16-19

The preliminary schedule is now available at http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/Events.aspx

Participate in roundtable discussions, learn about Library of Congress updates, OCLC updates, automation options, the Abraham Joshua Heschel archive, the Shel Silverstein Archive, Cairo Genizah, tweeting, skyping, chatting and more!

Early Bird Registration by April 16:  $485

Mail-in or online registration available at http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/Events.aspx

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Library Careers: Information Organization and Retrieval, Customer Service and More

Library Careers: Information Organization and Retrieval, Customer Service and More.

by Miranda J. McDermott, Grand Concourse February 14, 2013

Like most people, I never thought I would be a librarian while I was growing up. I tossed around a few ideas periodically: horse trainer, accountant, or psychologist, but I ultimately switched to library science while I was in graduate school. Why? I like working with people, but I do not necessarily want to be a clinical psychologist. I love working in a large urban public library system, providing services to those who need it most. I love working with kids, doing story times, and working at a research library on Sunday. I enjoy blogging and the excellent literary programs that NYPL staff and visiting presenters produce. I have been a librarian since 2003, and I have met a few people who are in library school or who have library degrees and were searching for jobs. This is a blog post for them. Read article….

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Academic Librarian Mentoring Project : An ACRL-NY Initiative

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The page showcases stories and articles written by participants in the Mentoring Program.

The Mentoring Experience by Kayla Shifrin

I’m halfway through the ACRL-NY Mentoring Program and so far I’ve found it very valuable, but not entirely for the reasons I expected. Recently I shadowed my mentor – Monica Berger of CUNY’S New York City College of Technology (City Tech) – as she staffed the reference desk on a busy Saturday afternoon. In the brief lulls between student questions, we spoke a great deal about the topics I expected to cover: the next career steps, what professional organizations to join, what to expect from an academic library career. But Monica also advised me on some more intangible subjects that were especially interesting because they weren’t part of my library school education.

Library school is all about discussing hypothetical situations that are frequently heightened or extreme. A knowledgeable scholar asks you a difficult reference question; you have to catalog a rare book that doesn’t appear in any standard bibliography; there’s a hurricane and you have to rescue the collection with the help of two interns and a bucket. Talking through these scenarios is excellent practice for real librarianship. But what’s left out are the average ‘daily grind’ sorts of experiences, and how real academic libraries may differ from the imaginary – and sometimes idealized – academic libraries used as classroom examples. Read more…

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