Episode 104: Professor Sees ‘Moral Imperative’ for Open Access – Tech Therapy – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Podcast link : http://chronicle.com/blogs/techtherapy/2013/03/06/episode-104-professor-sees-moral-imperative-for-open-access/?cid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

March 6, 2013, 3:12 pm

David Parry

David Parry, an assistant professor of emerging media and communications at the University of Texas at Dallas, argues that scholars have an obligation to publish their research in journals that make free copies available online. The Tech Therapy team talks with him about how the debate over open access to research has heated up in recent months, and invites journal publishers to give their views on next month’s podcast.

Links discussed in this episode: Memorials for Aaron Swartz Turn to Discussion of How to Honor His Legacy | Knowledge Cartels v. Knowledge Rights

Each month The Chronicle’s Tech Therapy podcast offers analysis of and advice on what the latest gadgets and buzzwords mean for professors, administrators, and students. Join your hosts, Jeff Young, The Chronicle’s technology editor, and Warren Arbogast, a technology consultant who works with colleges, for a lively discussion—as well as interviews with leading thinkers in technology.

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Poster Presentations 101: Creating Effective Presentations

These are excellent suggestions. I mentor library students and recent grads. Scholarly communication can begin with blogging, microblogging and poster sessions. I have an account with Slideshare and Authorstream and find the shows excellent. Best of course, if they have audio or proper annotation.

Mr. Library Dude

Poster sessions are a great opportunity to get your feet into the water and show off research you’ve done, a project you have implemented, or a new service you are providing.

More low-key than a full blown conference presentation, poster sessions are akin to an elevator speech – “Hey, look at these cool things I’m doing!” – as a librarian, that’s what I love about them: I get practical ideas and advice in a short amount of time that I can adapt or re-tool for my library.

At the 2012 American Library Association Annual Conference, I presented my first poster session: Assessment into Action: Meeting the Needs of Adult Learners. It was a great experience. I enjoyed taking a topic that I was interested in and using my design/creative skills to come up with a poster to share the information.

This semester, I’m teaching an undergrad information science class

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