How to Become an Influencer in Your Company

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf
Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

How to Become an Influencer in Your Company

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 2015-05-12 Email Print this article Print

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– See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Professionals become influencers by gaining the confidence of other influencers. So identify and align with decision-drivers who hold high-level positions or are key team members.

Be a Change Agent No one becomes an influencer by simply going along with the status quo. Promote new ideas and approaches. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.gPuIENWo.dpuf

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Poster Presentations 101: Creating Effective Presentations

These are excellent suggestions. I mentor library students and recent grads. Scholarly communication can begin with blogging, microblogging and poster sessions. I have an account with Slideshare and Authorstream and find the shows excellent. Best of course, if they have audio or proper annotation.

Mr. Library Dude

Poster sessions are a great opportunity to get your feet into the water and show off research you’ve done, a project you have implemented, or a new service you are providing.

More low-key than a full blown conference presentation, poster sessions are akin to an elevator speech – “Hey, look at these cool things I’m doing!” – as a librarian, that’s what I love about them: I get practical ideas and advice in a short amount of time that I can adapt or re-tool for my library.

At the 2012 American Library Association Annual Conference, I presented my first poster session: Assessment into Action: Meeting the Needs of Adult Learners. It was a great experience. I enjoyed taking a topic that I was interested in and using my design/creative skills to come up with a poster to share the information.

This semester, I’m teaching an undergrad information science class

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