How to Become an Influencer in Your Company

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf
Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

How to Become an Influencer in Your Company

By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 2015-05-12 Email Print this article Print

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– See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

Professionals become influencers by gaining the confidence of other influencers. So identify and align with decision-drivers who hold high-level positions or are key team members.

Be a Change Agent No one becomes an influencer by simply going along with the status quo. Promote new ideas and approaches. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.gPuIENWo.dpuf

Professionals rarely get ahead by simply being capable “doers.” They advance by establishing themselves as organizational influencers. In the recent book, Persuasion Equation: The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way (Amacom/available in May), author Mark Rodgers reveals how professionals can gain traction for their proposals, providing insights into how to turn a potential “no” into a likely “yes.” To achieve this, professionals must introduce distinctive—and even bold—ideas that stand out among all the others being presented to management. They also need to earn the buy-in of those within their organization who are already considered major influencers, regardless of their rank. And professionals have to support their proposals with clearly defined strategies and metrics to make them bulletproof. In addition, there are subtle qualities of persuasive people—such as the way they conduct a meeting or engage a colleague in a one-on-one discussion—that help build collective support for their ideas and proposals. The following steps to becoming an influencer are adapted from the book. Rodgers is a principal partner of the Peak Performance Business Group, a consultancy and training company that specializes in effective persuasion and communications. – See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/how-to-become-an-influencer-in-your-company.html#sthash.jiqSlxxK.dpuf

The Myth and the Reality of the Evolving Patron | American Libraries Magazine

Lee Rainie, director of the Pew Internet and American Life Project

By Brita Zitin

The Scoop

Lee Rainie

Lee Rainie, director of the Pew Internet and American Life Project, knows how to win over a roomful of librarians, as he proved at the RUSA President’s Program, where he was the keynote speaker. He’s generous with both his flattery (“Every day spent with librarians is a good day”) and his cat photos (the feline census of his slideshow reached well into the double digits). But he also delivers—in abundance—what information professionals really want: reliable data that makes library work more meaningful.

The research pursued by Rainie and his colleagues at the Pew Internet and American Life Project covers library use on the national level and cannot substitute for insight into a particular community gathered through the kind of deep listening advocated by the Harwood Institute [http://www.ala.org/transforminglibraries/libraries-transforming-communities]. Still, Rainie has a talent for translating these broad strokes into practical tips. Drawing on Pew’s recent report “Parents, Children, Libraries, and Reading,” he said, “If you want to figure out who loves you most, it’s parents of minor children, and within that, the moms. Romance the moms.” Read more…

via The Myth and the Reality of the Evolving Patron | American Libraries Magazine.

Expect More : Driving Innovation , Community , Success , & Scalability. Stephen Abram, MLS. Edmonton Public Library Trustees February 12, 2013

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