Gender in the Job Interview

Career Advice | Job interviews |Women in the workplace

by Robin Mamlet | February 21, 2017

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Tim Foley for The Chronicle

 

As women move up the leadership ranks in higher education, they find fewer and fewer female peers. That’s been fairly well documented by the American Council on Education and other sources, and is no surprise to those of us in the executive-search industry.

Why that’s the case is a topic fraught with complexity. There is the matter of stepping up and Leaning In to be sure, but there is also sexism — sometimes the overt kind and sometimes the subtle kind that occurs all along the leadership trajectory and affects who is mentored, who is labeled “leadership material,” and who gets the kind of opportunities and assignments that lead most directly to advancement.

Of the many factors that limit women’s advancement, two are things we ought to be able to resolve: how candidates present themselves in job interviews and how search committees interpret those interviews. Read more…

 

 

 

Master Confrontation

Leadership & Management Career Coach, Introvert Whisperer

If you’re a leader or intend to be, you will have to do things to step out of your comfort zone. It’s part of the job.

Confronting peers, subordinates and even the boss (at times) when results aren’t matching plan expectations must take place to steer things back to where they need to be. If you avoid it, you are knowingly allowing the business to drive over the metaphorical cliff. It’s a poor business practice.

Granted confrontation feels so uncomfortable that the majority of people avoid it altogether. Of course, we know stories of the ugly side of confrontation when a leader has allowed the situation to fester to an ugly, emotional rampage. Even though this type of tirade may make the point for course correction, it’s damaging and dysfunctional. No one wins.

What’s the solution? Read more…