​The Sharing Economy and libraries: does “access over ownership” ring a bell? (FREE IFLA/ALA Webinar, March 8)

Professional development | Continuing education | Webinar | Advocacy

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IFLA New Professionals Special Interest Group

Sharing Economy and Libraries

People around the world have been transforming the unused capacity of things they own and services they provide, such as business expertise, power tools, bikes and even cars. The National Journal writes “Libraries are especially apt to increase their relevance in the coming years, considering the rise of the ‘sharing economy,’ a concept arguably invented by the first libraries.”

In the digital era, how do libraries continue to be relevant community resources?

Even though the Sharing Economy model resembles a traditional library borrowing model, libraries are extending their services to borrow everything — from seeds and kitchen appliances to music instruments, crafting tools, sewing machines and opening Repair Cafes.

Join us for the webinar on March 8 at 11:00 am EST (5:00 pm CET) with Loida Garcia-Febo and George Needham!

Speakers

Loida Garcia FeboKeynote: “Librarians building capacity for advocacy through education” by Loida Garcia-Febo

Libraries are pillars of public…

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[IFLA-L] Open Societies are Healthy Societies: IFLA rejects unjustified barriers to the free movement of persons

Human Rights | Library ethics & Advocacy | Freedom of Movement

logo-iflaOpen Societies are Healthy Societies

Libraries are at the heart of healthy societies. By bringing people together – students, researchers, creators, citizens – they support learning, sharing, and the creation of new ideas.

They also support the delivery of key human rights, as set out both in national constitutions and international conventions, most importantly the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: freedom of expression and access to information, as well as the right to participate in cultural life and enjoy the benefits of scientific progress.

Libraries have long supported the flow of ideas and information across borders. IFLA has called for reforms to laws that hold this back. Evidence shows that such flows promote innovation and creativity, which in turn drives growth, jobs and equality everywhere.

However, arbitrary and unjustified barriers to the movement of people jeopardise this situation. Such policies run contrary to states’ obligations under international law, which prohibit discrimination of any kind on the basis of race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status, as set out in the UN’s New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants.

Read more:  www.ifla.org/node/11176

On the anniversary of the Charlie Hebdo attack dissenting voices must be protected

ch-pen-image

Reaffirming our commitment to protecting free expression

On the anniversary of the Charlie Hebdo attacks, PEN International has issued a statement aimed at encouraging governments to protect critical voices and freedom of expression.

IFLA and dozens of other free-speech organisations, institutes, and associations have added their signature to the statement in support of the crucial principles outlined and addressed.

The statement calls on all Governments to:

  • Uphold their international obligations to protect the rights of freedom of expression and information for all, and especially for journalists, writers, artists and human rights defenders to publish, write and speak freely;
  • Promote a safe and enabling environment for those who exercise their right to freedom of expression, and ensure that journalists, artists and human rights defenders may perform their work without interference;
  • Combat impunity for threats and violations aimed at journalists and others exercising their right to freedom of expression, and ensure impartial, timely and thorough investigations that bring the executors and masterminds behind such crimes to justice. Also ensure victims and their families have expedient access to appropriate remedies;
  • Repeal legislation which restricts the right to legitimate freedom of expression, especially vague and overbroad national security, sedition, obscenity, blasphemy and criminal defamation laws, and other legislation used to imprison, harass and silence critical voices, including on social media and online;
  • Ensure that respect for human rights is at the heart of communication surveillance policy. Laws and legal standards governing communication surveillance must therefore be updated, strengthened and brought under legislative and judicial control. Any interference can only be justified if it is clearly defined by law, pursues a legitimate aim and is strictly necessary to the aim pursued.

Read the full statement: English | français

E-Books in Libraries: A Global Question of Survival? | IFLA

E-Books in Libraries: A Global Question of Survival? | IFLA.

An IFLA Management of Library Associations (MLAS) Seminar in Cooperation with the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) on the Challenges in Front of Us

When

21 February 2013

Where

London, United Kingdom

IFLA will be represented by the Governing Board and Headquarters Staff

[PDF] | [MS Word]

The transformation of the media market and the emergence of eBooks is causing great changes to library models worldwide. The answers we find to the challenges emerging, and the positions and models we develop will be crucial for our future. This is the reason why IFLA’s Management of Library Associations (MLAS) Committee and the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) are organizing an important seminar in London in February.

Over hundreds of years libraries decided what books to buy and use for public lending in accordance with their collection building policies. In the world of e-books libraries no longer have such a right. It is a significant – and in our view unacceptable – change that today the acquisition policies of libraries may be decided by publishers and not by libraries themselves. The challenge is to find solutions to this problem.  It is a question of our survival.

IFLA is deeply concerned about this development. Currently, the Governing Board and experts are elaborating “IFLA Principles on eLending”. IFLA will be concentrating on this issue during 2013 with workshops and presentations. The start will be MLAS/CILIP seminar in London.

Experts from all continents will report on the situation around the world, and successful lobbying activities and campaigns will be presented. IFLA will present fundamental position papers. Together, we want to develop new strategies.

If you want to know what happens worldwide and deal with this problem together with IFLA, come to the seminar in London. Work on new strategies together with us.

Location

CILIP
7 Ridgmount Street
London, WC1E 7AE
United Kingdom

Registration

The seminar is free of charge, however the number of participants is limited.

Note: This event is now FULLY BOOKED.  If you are interested in attending please email your name, job title and organisation to events@cilip.org.uk and we will inform you if any places become available.