Top Five Skills Required For Librarians Today & Tomorrow

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Because today’s librarians must be experts in dealing with both physical and digital information, we have identified the Top 5 skills every librarian must have, or develop, in order to succeed now and into the future. I will touch on all five today and explore them individually in the weeks to come.

1. Information Curation

Since the primary role of any type of library is information curation, the need for that skill set will never go away. However it will evolve as volume and variety of information expands. As content creation becomes available to all, information curation becomes a more critical skill. Librarians are becoming increasingly vital in the process of evaluating and editing what is most valuable, as well as categorizing and classifying it for easy retrieval and use.

2. In-Depth, High Value Research

The digital information environment operates mostly on a ‘Find It Yourself’ paradigm, a model that has threatened the very existence of librarians. Yet finding what they need and want can be a significant challenge for consumers and users of information. Most people lack good research skills and all of us are dealing with a velocity and volume of information that is difficult to manage. As the proverbial haystack gets bigger, finding the needle gets tougher, making librarians a valuable go-to resource. Read more…

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A Harvard psychologist says there’s a personality trait that’s just as important as charisma and is easier to develop

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Some people are naturally more charismatic than others.

Bill Clinton, Oprah Winfrey, and Martin Luther King Jr. had the ability to captivate and inspire their audiences the way few other leaders could.

Yet Harvard psychologist Amy Cuddy says there’s a personality trait that’s just as important as charisma — and it’s considerably easier to develop.

That trait is what she calls “presence,” and it’s the subject of her new book by the same name.

“Presence,” as Cuddy defines it, is about being attuned to and able to express your full potential — whether in an important presentation or a conversation with your boss.

During a recent talk at the 92Y in New York City, Cuddy explained the difference between charisma and presence, and why presence isn’t something that only certain people are born with:

Charisma seems to be more about the intoxicating quality that you have on other people, as opposed to presence, which is more about the self in relation to others, and how you feel you represented yourself in a situation, and how you were able to engage. So it’s less about how others see you and more about how you see yourself Read more...

10 things I wish someone had told me when I was 20 by Nelson Wang, Quora

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This post from entrepreneurNelson Wang originally appeared on Quora as an answer to the question “What is it that nobody tells you about adult life?

My second startup had just completely failed. I came home on a Saturday night at midnight and there was a letter on my kitchen counter.

It was from a law firm threatening to sue my company.

It felt like someone kicked me in my stomach. It was one of the worst feelings in the world.

In the last 31 years of living, I wish there were a few key lessons someone taught me as I was growing up.

Here are the 10 things I felt like nobody told me about adult life:

1. The most valuable currency in the world is time

Money is valuable. Time is even more valuable.

Time is finite. Once you spend it, you cannot earn it back.

Use money to help you find more time. Time with your friends, family and loved ones. Read more…

3 Reasons Millennials Are Getting Fired A backlash to Milllennials’ mindsets at work is causing some to get fired. Here’s why.

BY J.T. O’DONNELL

Founder and CEO, CareerHMO.com
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IMAGE: Getty Images

Recently, I wrote this article explaining why Millennials aren’t getting promoted. In response to Millennial readers’ requests for a deeper understanding of how being misperceived can negatively affect their careers, I’m taking it a step further and outlining exactly what’s getting them fired.

Employers are seriously fed up.

To get a sense of how heated this has become, read this article by one irate employerand his prediction of the backlash that will soon ensue from the Millennials’ attitudes toward work.

Additionally, this survey by SmartRecruiter of 28,000 bosses detailing where Millennials are falling short is just one example of the data to support the huge disconnect costing some Millennials their jobs. Here are the key takeaways Millennials need to know.

1. Employers don’t want to be parents.

Growing up, Millennials were coached their entire lives and they unknowingly assume employers will coach them too. However, the relationship isn’t the same. An employer pays us to do a job. We are service providers. Expecting extensive training and professional development to do the job doesn’t make financial sense. In many employers’ minds (especially, small to midsized businesses with limited budgets and resources), Millennials should foot the bill to develop themselves and make themselves worth more to the employer.

read more…

 

16 Traits of Winning Employees

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There is no such thing as the perfect employee. However, there are certain tell-tale signs that will either allude to the fact that a hire will work out or will turn into a headache.

The saying goes – a job seeker is either part of the problem or part of the solution. When a new hire is part of the problem, they cost the company money, emotional energy and if nothing is done about it can become a significant management issue.

On the other hand, when a job seeker who is hired utilizes the below traits they currently possess and work to acquire the ones they don’t yet have, they turn into leaders and winners within the organization.

Top traits of successful employees:

The individuals with the below traits become the wealthiest, most successful and respected in the professional world.

1. A strong work ethic coupled with a passion for improvement. Work ethic is the foundation of anything worthwhile. In life, the most rewarding goals require diligent work and focus. Intelligence, creativity and passion become nearly useless without the willingness to work hard.

2. Exceptional organizational skills and an understanding of the time, business and money organization brings.

3. High energy that becomes contagious and is one significant component to becoming a leader.

4. Positive outlook with a realistic sense of what to the difference is between optimistic and overly confident and unrealistic.

5. Strong sense of accountability. In life and work, things don’t always go as planned. Mistakes are part of the journey of becoming better and better…unless you don’t fess up to the mishaps, which is a habit that will hurt others’ perceptions of you for the rest of your career and life.

On the other hand, when a job seeker who is hired utilizes the below traits they currently possess and work to acquire the ones they don’t yet have, they turn into leaders and winners within the organization.

 Read more…

5 Ways To Scare Away Your Career Mentor

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Wherever you are in your career, seeking out a mentor is a great way to boost your career and expand your network. In fact, 75 percent of executives say mentoring plays a major role in their career — and 95 percent of Millennials just starting out their careers want a mentor. Through your mentor, you’ll likely meet new people, learn new skills, and maybe even find new job opportunities.

Sounds pretty straightforward, right?

Well having a mentor doesn’t guarantee automatic success. Being a mentee comes with responsibility and takes care to create a successful relationship. And it can go south fast if you’re not careful.

So make sure you aren’t scaring off your mentor and consider the following behaviors to avoid:

1. Being vague with your needs.

Be specific about what you need from your mentor. These needs could include professional development, access to opportunities and networks, desiring a role model, or even just a safe space to discuss experiences or career issues. Don’t expect your mentor to know or understand automatically just by reading your resume and meeting you. Otherwise, neither of you will gain anything from the relationship and you’ll likely just frustrate them.

Read more…

12 Choices to Help You Step Back From Burnout by Vicki Davis

Author Vicki Davis surrounds herself with sayings and thoughts to help her stay positive. Photo credit: Vicki Davis

“Our very lives are fashioned by choice. First we make choices. Then our choices make us.” – Anne Frank

A tired teacher is a powder keg waiting for a match. In my bouts with burnout, I’ve learned that stepping back from the brink is about choice. These 12 choices have helped me recover and be a better teacher for my students.

Choice #1: Choose to Be Happy

First, happiness is a choice. Choose to be the first one to smile at everybody you meet. Choose to greet your students by name.

Use happy triggers to boost your mood when you get upset. I have a Pinterest Board called Happy Thoughts and another called Things That Make Me Laugh. The “Atta Girl” folder in my desk holds nice notes.

Choice #2: Choose to Disconnect

We are making a dumb use of our smartphones. Instead of freeing us up to go anywhere anytime, they’ve tethered us to a hamster wheel. Usually, I check email twice a day. I deleted my school email off my smartphone after several evenings because of an angry email. (We all get them.) Unplug once a week. Be a human being, not a human doing.

Read more…