8 Ways Millennials Can Build Leadership Skills By Laura McMullen Aug. 19, 2015

By Aug. 19, 2015 | 11:07 a.m. EDT + More

So ‘leader’ isn’t in your job title.

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(Getty Images)

No one is asking you to manage a team or take charge of a multimillion-dollar project. So what? Even young, green employees can boost their leadership skills by learning from others and volunteering for small-scale assignments. And they should learn to lead now, given that 73 percent of the nearly 800 participants in The Hartford 2014 Millennial Leadership Survey said they aspire to be leaders in the next five years. Continue for eight expert-approved ways young people can learn to lead.

Next: Observe and learn.

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5 Office Mistakes Costing Millennials the Promotion How managers are misinterpreting Millennials’ approach to success in the workplace.

By J.T. O’Donnell
Founder and CEO, CareerHMO.com
IMAGE: Getty Images

Now that career-minded Millennials make up 50 percent of our workplace, it’s safe to assume (like every other generation to enter the work force) they’ll want to earn promotions as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, we’re hearing across the board that a lot of Millennial workers aren’t promotion material, citing a lack of drive and professionalism. However, the real problem lies in a lack of Millennial understanding of the power of perception. In my experience, simple insights are all Millennials need to turn things around.

“People hear what they see.” –Doris Day

We know actions speak louder than words. What some Millennials don’t understand is certain actions at work give the perception they’re lazy and unskilled.

Let’s take a look at the most common mistakes Millennials make and how they get misperceived.

1. Being a clock-puncher. Millennials value their free time. As a result, some tend to be meticulous about only working the hours they’re paid for–to the second, i.e., they walk in at 8:29 a.m. and leave at 5:59 p.m. on the dot (because they took exactly 30 minutes for lunch). When you’re so focused on leaving the office not a minute later than you need to stay, you send the message you couldn’t care less about the work you’re doing. In the mind of management, it’s just a job to you. Perhaps that’s the case, but managers have no desire to promote people who aren’t focused on and interested in the work they do.

Advice to Millennials: Once or twice a week, stay 15 minutes past your normal work hour and get an extra task done. As the rest of your peers exit en masse, you can score a chance to say good night and make small talk with your boss about what you’re working on and why you chose to stay late to finish it. Those moments can help you build a better personal connection with your boss and show you aren’t obsessed with the clock–two things the boss will consider when a promotion comes available.

Read more:

Millennials: Here’s Why Employers Won’t Hire You And the Fix

Millennials: Here’s Why Employers Won’t Hire You (And the Fix)

MillennialsHey Millennials! Did you know employers are three times more likely to hire a mature worker than they are to hire you?

That’s right. According to a survey of recruiters, 60 percent of employers would rather hire mature workers, while only 20 percent would choose to hire Millennials. Why?

There are apparently several critical qualities employers said many Millennials lack. Let’s take a look at those, as well as what we Millennials can do to overcome those perceptions:

Mature Workers Associated with Increased Professionalism

Mature workers were considered reliable by 91 percent of employers and professional by 88 percent. For Millennial workers, only five percent of recruiters said they were professional and two percent said reliable.

To change this negative perception, you should deliberately focus on emphasizing your reliability. Talk about specific times in your career when others depended on you and you delivered. Additionally, it’s easy to show you’re professional by dressing the part and following up with the proper etiquette in emails and interviews. Read more…

 

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