Careers for Info Utopia: The optimism of a new semester | Blatant Berry

BerryWebB Careers for Info Utopia: The optimism of a new semester | Blatant BerryThe beginning of each semester always rejuvenates me. There is nothing more stimulating than those first few sessions with a class of expectant students, arriving with their high energy, curiosity, and desire to participate and impress. My new class at Pratt Institute’s SILS came to New York from all over America and the world. The students range in age from their 20s to their 60s, which has so often been typical of my LIS classes. It is a great privilege and honor to work with them to try to answer the accursed questions that continue to plague our profession.

In prior years I have worried for these new librarians about the shortage of jobs in our field, the low salaries, and the uncertainty in the outlook for libraries of all types.

This year, however, I feel much more positive about the opportunities available to these new information professionals and more optimistic about the potential for the future and the careers that they will find. I have no doubt now that they will move us nearer to the resolution of the many challenges we face. Read more…

 

Millennials: Here’s Why Employers Won’t Hire You And the Fix

Millennials: Here’s Why Employers Won’t Hire You (And the Fix)

MillennialsHey Millennials! Did you know employers are three times more likely to hire a mature worker than they are to hire you?

That’s right. According to a survey of recruiters, 60 percent of employers would rather hire mature workers, while only 20 percent would choose to hire Millennials. Why?

There are apparently several critical qualities employers said many Millennials lack. Let’s take a look at those, as well as what we Millennials can do to overcome those perceptions:

Mature Workers Associated with Increased Professionalism

Mature workers were considered reliable by 91 percent of employers and professional by 88 percent. For Millennial workers, only five percent of recruiters said they were professional and two percent said reliable.

To change this negative perception, you should deliberately focus on emphasizing your reliability. Talk about specific times in your career when others depended on you and you delivered. Additionally, it’s easy to show you’re professional by dressing the part and following up with the proper etiquette in emails and interviews. Read more…

 

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Jobs Aren’t Hidden But They Are Guarded by Gatekeepers

 

KeyWhen I present to college students about launching an effective job search, one of my slides is an iceberg graphic. Under the surface of the water, in the largest portion of the iceberg, the words “hidden job market” appear.

 

I tell the audience “some career experts say that 80% of jobs that get filled don’t get posted.”

 

What I don’t say is: not this career expert.

Although I don’t believe the conventional wisdom about the extent of the hidden job market, I want students to think that most jobs aren’t posted, so they don’t get complacent and put their main focus on job boards. I want them to be out there networking. Read more…

 

7 Ways Your LinkedIn Profile And Resume Should Differ

At the core of your LinkedIn experience is your profile. As you complete it, you are prompted to include information for all of your educational background as well as companies and positions that you’ve held over the course of your career.

Sounds pretty much like a résumé, right?

Not so much.

LinkedIn is evolving and if you are a savvy job hunter, you will seize the opportunity to utilize its new features to your advantage

 

 

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What Does It Mean to Be Professional at Work? – On Careers usnews.com

What Does It Mean to Be Professional at Work? – On Careers usnews.com.

July 22, 2013 RSS Feed Print

Alison Green

Alison Green

You probably know that it’s important to be professional if you want to have a successful career, but what does that actually mean? After all, professionalism is rarely taught; you’re supposed to pick it up on your own through a combination of observation and osmosis, but that’s not always easy to do. And learning on the job can be fraught with land mines, since you might not even see your mistakes coming.

So without further adieu, here are 10 key elements of professionalism that you should master early in your career.

1. Pay attention to the cultural norms in your organization, and follow them. If you watch how others in your office operate, you’ll learn all sorts of important things about “how we do things here.” For instance, you might observe that everyone shows up precisely on time for meetings, that they modulate their voices when others are on the phone, and that people rely on email for non-urgent questions. These are important signals for what will be expected of your own behavior – and you’ll come across as tone-deaf if you ignore them. Read more…